PART 7 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS: WHAT CHEMICALS IS THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SPRAYING ON YOUR STATE TO KILL MARIJUANA PLANTS?

PART 7 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS
Posted by 2018 political candidate for U.S. Congress, Cris Ericson, in Vermont, with the assistance of U.S. Marijuana Party http://usmjparty.com Publisher & Editor in Chief, Sheree Krider.
“Prima facie”, in the law, means that if you have a state offense for marijuana spelled with a j in the law, marihuana spelled with an h in the law, or cannabis, then that is OBVIOUS that you may have also violated federal law. How many Vermont State Senators and Vermont Representatives know that they may be setting you up for a federal prison term, by their little ol’ Vermont slap on the hand statute?

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/prima+facie
Statutes may specify that certain evidence is prima facie
evidence of a certain fact. For example, a duly authenticated copy of a defendant’s criminal record may be considered prima facie evidence of the defendant’s prior convictions and may be used against the defendant in court. (Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 18-3-412 [West 1996]).

This is why plea bargains should be outlawed:
too many people under pressure or torture as a pre-trial detainee in a jail, or family obligations such as needing to get out of jail to take care of a sick person in the family, or whatever, plead guilty to something they are not guilty at all of. This, then sets them up wrongfully under “prima facie” evidence of a “prior record”.

TITLE 21 USC 962; TITLE 21 USC 967;
TITLE 21 USC 1705; TITLE 21 USC 1708; 21 USC 1713.
Please remember to contact your Vermont State Senators
and State Representatives and ask them to please vote
against Governor Phil Scott’s VETO of RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA during the special veto session June 21 and June 22, 2017.

TITLE 21 UNITED STATES CODE Section 962
http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=marihuana&f=treesort&fq=true&num=28&hl=true&edition=prelim&granuleId=USC-prelim-title21-section962 TITLE 21 / CHAPTER 13 / SUBCHAPTER II / § 962
21 USC 962: Second or subsequent offenses
Text contains those laws in effect on June 10, 2017
From Title 21-FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER 13-DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION AND CONTROL
SUBCHAPTER II-IMPORT AND EXPORT
§ 962. Second or subsequent offenses
(a) Term of imprisonment and fine
Any person convicted of any offense under this subchapter is, if the offense is a second or subsequent offense,
punishable by a term of imprisonment twice
that otherwise authorized, by twice
the fine otherwise authorized, or by both.
If the conviction is for an offense punishable
under section 960(b) of this title, and if it is the offender’s second or subsequent offense,
the court shall impose,
in addition to any term of imprisonment and fine,
twice the term of supervised release otherwise authorized.
(b) Determination of status
For purposes of this section, a person shall be considered
convicted of a second or subsequent offense if,
prior to the commission of such offense,
one or more prior convictions of such person
for a felony drug offense have become final.
(c) Procedures applicable
Section 851 of this title shall apply with respect
to any proceeding to sentence a person under this section.
Amendments
1994-Subsec. (b). Pub. L. 103–322 substituted
“one or more prior convictions of such person for a felony drug offense have become final”
for “one or more prior convictions of him for a felony
under any provision of this subchapter or subchapter I of this chapter or other law
of a State,
the United States,
or a foreign country
relating to narcotic drugs,
marihuana,
or depressant or stimulant drugs, have become final”.

TITLE 21 USC 967
http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=marihuana&f=treesort&fq=true&num=29&hl=true&edition=prelim&granuleId=USC-prelim-title21-section967 TITLE 21 / CHAPTER 13 / SUBCHAPTER II / § 967
21 USC 967: Smuggling of controlled substances; investigations; oaths; subpenas;
witnesses; evidence; production of records; territorial limits; fees and mileage of witnesses
Text contains those laws in effect on June 10, 2017
From Title 21-FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER 13-DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION AND CONTROL
SUBCHAPTER II-IMPORT AND EXPORT
For the purpose of any investigation which, in the opinion of the Secretary of the Treasury,
is necessary and proper to the enforcement of section 545 of title 18 (relating to smuggling
goods into the United States) with respect to any controlled substance (as defined in section 802
of this title), the Secretary of the Treasury may administer oaths and affirmations,
subpena witnesses, compel their attendance, take evidence, and require the production
of records (including books, papers, documents and tangible things which constitute or
contain evidence) relevant or material to the investigation. The attendance of witnesses
and the production of records may be required from any place within the customs territory
of the United States, except that a witness shall not be required to appear at any hearing distant
more than 100 miles from the place where he was served with subpena. Witnesses summoned
by the Secretary shall be paid the same fees and mileage that are paid witnesses in the courts
of the United States. Oaths and affirmations may be made at any place subject to the jurisdiction
of the United States.
Amendments
1970-Pub. L. 91–513 substituted “section 545 of title 18 (relating to smuggling goods
into the United States) with respect to any controlled substance (as defined in section 802
of this title)” for “the laws of the United States relating to narcotic drugs and
marihuana”
and substituted the customs territory of the United States for any State or any territory
or other place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States is the defined area from within
which the attendance of witnesses and the production of records may be required, and struck
out provisions making the discretion of the Secretary of the Treasury the determinative factor
as to what is relevant or material to the investigation.

TITLE 21 USC 1705 NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL STRATEGY
http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=marijuana&f=treesort&fq=true&num=18&hl=true&edition=prelim&granuleId=USC-prelim-title21-section1705 TITLE 21 / CHAPTER 22 / § 1705
21 USC 1705: Development, submission, implementation, and assessment of National Drug Control Strategy
Text contains those laws in effect on June 10, 2017
From Title 21-FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER 22-NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY
§ 1705. Development, submission, implementation, and assessment of National Drug Control Strategy
(a) Timing, contents, and process for development and submission of National Drug Control Strategy
(1) Timing
Not later than February 1 of each year, the
President shall submit to Congress
a National Drug Control Strategy,
which shall set forth a comprehensive plan
for the year to reduce illicit drug use
and the consequences of such illicit drug use
in the United States by limiting the availability of,
and reducing the demand for, illegal drugs.
(2) Contents
(A) In general
The National Drug Control Strategy
submitted under paragraph (1) shall include the following:
(i) Comprehensive, research-based, long-range, quantifiable goals for reducing illicit
drug use and the consequences of illicit drug use in the United States. (ii) Annual quantifiable and measurable objectives and specific targets to accomplish
long-term quantifiable goals that the Director determines may be achieved during
each year beginning on the date on which the National Drug Control Strategy is submitted.
(iii) A 5-year projection for program and budget priorities. (iv) A review of international, State, local, and private sector drug control activities
to ensure that the United States pursues coordinated and effective drug control at all levels of government.
(v) An assessment of current illicit drug use (including inhalants and steroids) and
availability, impact of illicit drug use, and treatment availability, which assessment
shall include-
(I) estimates of drug prevalence and frequency of use as measured by national, State,
and local surveys of illicit drug use and by other special studies of nondependent and
dependent illicit drug use;
(II) illicit drug use in the workplace and the productivity lost by such use; and
(III) illicit drug use by arrestees, probationers, and parolees. (vi) An assessment of the reduction of illicit drug availability, as measured by-
(I) the quantities of cocaine, heroin,
marijuana,
methamphetamine, ecstasy, and
other drugs available for consumption in the United States;
(II) the amount of
marijuana,
cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, ecstasy, and
precursor chemicals and other drugs entering the United States; (III) the number of illicit drug manufacturing laboratories seized and destroyed
and the number of hectares of
marijuana,
poppy, and coca cultivated and destroyed
domestically and in other countries;
(IV) the number of metric tons of
marijuana,
heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine
seized and other drugs; and
(V) changes in the price and purity of heroin, methamphetamine, and cocaine, changes
in the price of ecstasy, and changes in tetrahydrocannabinol level of marijuana
and other drugs.

TITLE 21 USC 1708 NATIONAL YOUTH ANTI-DRUG MEDIA CAMPAIGN
http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=marijuana&f=treesort&fq=true&num=19&hl=true&edition=prelim&granuleId=USC-prelim-title21-section1708 TITLE 21 / CHAPTER 22 / § 1708
21 USC 1708: National youth anti-drug media campaign
Text contains those laws in effect on June 10, 2017
From Title 21-FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER 22-NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY
…ETC., …ETC.,…
(j) Prevention of marijuana use
(1) Findings
The Congress finds the following:
(A) 60 percent of adolescent admissions for drug treatment are based on marijuana use.
(B) Potency levels of contemporary marijuana, particularly
hydroponically grown marijuana,
are significantly higher than in the past, rising from under 1 percent of THC in the mid-1970s
to as high as 30 percent today.
(C) Contemporary research has demonstrated that youths smoking marijuana early in life may be up to 5 times more likely to use hard drugs. (D) Contemporary research has demonstrated clear detrimental effects in adolescent
educational achievement resulting from marijuana use.
(E) Contemporary research has demonstrated clear detrimental effects in adolescent brain
development resulting from marijuana use.
(F) An estimated 9,000,000 Americans a year drive while under the influence of illegal drugs,
including marijuana.
(G) Marijuana smoke contains 50 to 70 percent more of certain cancer causing chemicals
than tobacco smoke.
(H) Teens who use marijuana are up to 4 times more likely to have a teen pregnancy
than teens who have not.
(I) Federal law enforcement agencies have identified clear links suggesting that trade
in hydroponic marijuana facilitates trade by criminal organizations in hard drugs,
including heroin.
(J) Federal law enforcement agencies have identified possible links between trade
in cannabis products and financing for terrorist organizations. (2) Emphasis on prevention of youth marijuana use
In conducting advertising and activities otherwise authorized under this section,
the Director may emphasize prevention of youth marijuana use.

21 USC 1713
TITLE 21 / CHAPTER 22 / § 1713 SPRAY & ERADICATE MARIJUANA WITH “APPROVED” HERBICIDES (WEED KILLERS)
http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=cannabis&f=treesort&fq=true&num=5&hl=true&edition=prelim&granuleId=USC-prelim-title21-section1713 21 USC 1713: Authorization of use of environmentally-approved herbicides to eliminate illicit narcotics crops
Text contains those laws in effect on June 10, 2017
From Title 21-FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER 22-NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY
§ 1713. Authorization of use of environmentally-approved herbicides to eliminate illicit narcotics crops.
The Secretary of State, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary of Defense, the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy,
and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency are authorized to support the development and use
of environmentally-approved
herbicides
to eliminate illicit narcotics crops,
including coca,
cannabis,
and opium poppy, both in the United States and in foreign countries.

(See below, federal marijuana laws parts 1,2,3,4,5,6)
https://www.loc.gov/
http://uscode.house.gov/browse.xhtml
PART 1 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS
http://ibrattleboro.com/sections/other/part-1-federal-marijuana-laws-trump-state-marijuana-laws-so-it-time-learn-federal-pot PART 2 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS
http://ibrattleboro.com/sections/other/part-2-federal-marijuana-laws-governor-phil-scott-consider-morning-his-big-decision-i PART 3 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS
http://ibrattleboro.com/sections/other/part-3-federal-marijuana-laws-20-years-and-not-more-life-imprisonment-etc PART 4 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS
http://ibrattleboro.com/sections/other/part-4-federal-marijuana-laws-demonstration-protest-june-21-june-22-montpelier PART 5 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS
http://ibrattleboro.com/sections/other/part-5-federal-marijuana-laws-go-federal-prison-selling-bong-or-roach-clip PART 6 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS
http://ibrattleboro.com/sections/other/part-6-federal-marijuana-laws-not-knowing-law-form-entrapment

Coming soon to ibrattleboro.com
PART 8 FEDERAL MARIJUANA LAWS:
Title 3 USC; Title 5 USC; Title 20 USC;
Title 22 USC; Title 23 USC; Title 25 USC;
Title 26 USC; Title 28 USC; Title 42 USC;
Title 48 USC; Title 49 USC and International Treaties

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