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U.S. Marijuana Party - Organizer U.S. Marijuana Party Kentucky Sheree Krider, LLC Cave City, Kentucky 42127 270-834-7332

The Origin of the Word ‘Marijuana’

Anna Wilcox

The word “marijuana” plays a controversial role in cannabis culture. Many well-known organizations such as Oakland’s Harborside Heath Center have publicly denounced “the M word” in favor of our favorite plant’s Latinate name, cannabis. Even Salon Magazine, a major press outlet outside of the cannabis industry, published an article titled “Is the word ‘Marijuana’ racist?” last year.

As mainstream culture becomes a little more herb-friendly, the terminology used by the industry is coming to center stage. But, why exactly does the term “marijuana” cause so much debate? Even worse, why has the word gained publicity as a racist term?

To save you from reading those lengthy history books or some boring academic articles, we’ve created this brief timeline to give you the low-down on “marijuana”’s rise to popularity in the United States. Here’s what you need to know:

The Mexican Revolution

1840-1900:

Prior to 1910, “marijuana” didn’t exist as a word in American culture. Rather, “cannabis” was used, most often in reference to medicines and remedies for common household ailments. In the early 1900s, what have now become pharmaceutical giants—Bristol-Meyer’s Squib and Eli Lilly—used to include cannabis and cannabis extracts in their medicines.

During this time, Americans (particularly elite Americans) were going through a hashish trend. Glamorized by literary celebrities such as Alexander Dumas, experimenting with cannabis products became a fad among those wealthy enough to afford imported goods.

1910:

Between the years of 1910 and 1920, over 890,000 Mexicans legally immigrated into the United States seeking refuge from the wreckage of civil war. Though cannabis had been a part of U.S. history since the country’s beginnings, the idea of smoking the plant recreationally was not as common as other forms of consumption. The idea of smoking cannabis entered mainstream American consciousness after the arrival of immigrants who brought the smoking habit with them.

1913:

The first bill criminalizing the cultivation of “locoweed” was passed in California. The bill was a major push from the Board of Pharmacy as a way to regulate opiates and psychoactive pharmaceuticals, and seemingly did not stem from the “reefer madness” or racialized understanding of “marijuana” that paved the way to full-on prohibition in the 1930s.

The Aftermath

1930s:

The Great Depression had just hit the United States, and Americans were searching for someone to blame. Due to the influx of immigrants (particularly in the South) and the rise of suggestive jazz music, many white Americans began to treat cannabis (and, arguably, the Blacks and Mexican immigrants who consumed it) as a foreign substance used to corrupt the minds and bodies of low-class individuals.

In the time just before the federal criminalization of the plant, 29 states independently banned the herb that came to be known as “marijuana.”

Harry Anslinger:

It would not be an overstatement to say that Harry Anslinger was one of the primary individuals responsible for creating the stigma surrounding cannabis. Hired as the first director of the recently created Federal Bureau of Narcotics in 1930, Anslinger launched a vigilant campaign against cannabis that would hold steady for the three decades he remained in office.

A very outspoken man, Anslinger used the recent development of the movie theater to spread messages that racialized the plant for white audiences. In one documented incident, Anslinger testified before Congress, explaining:

“Marijuana is the most violence-causing drug in the history of mankind… Most marijuana smokers are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage.”

In another statement, Anslinger articulated: “Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men…the primary reason to outlaw marijuana is its effect on the degenerate races.”

In retrospect, Anslinger’s efforts with the Bureau of Narcotics were the reason “marijuana” became a word known by Americans all over the country. When making public appearances and crafting propaganda films such as Reefer Madness, Anslinger specifically used the term “marijuana” when campaigning against the plant, adding to the development of the herb’s new “foreign” identity.

Cannabis was no longer the plant substance found in medicines and consumed unanimously by American’s all over the country.

1937:

The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 was the culmination of Anslinger’s work and the first step to all-out prohibition. The bill federally criminalized the cannabis plant in every U.S. state. In order to discourage the production of cannabis use, the Tax Act of 1937 placed a one dollar tax on anyone who sold or cultivated the cannabis plant.

On top of the tax itself, the bill mandated that all individuals comply with certain enforcement provisions. Violation of the provisions would result in imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $2,000.

Though the word “marijuana” is the most common name for cannabis in the United States today, its history is deeply steeped in race, politics, and a complicated cultural revolution. Some argue that using the word ignores a history of oppression against Mexican immigrants and African Americans, while others insist that the term has now lost its prejudiced bite. Regardless of whether or not you decide to use the word yourself, it’s impossible to deny the magnitude and racial implications of its introduction to the American lexicon.

CONTINUE READING…

PLEASE POST THIS PRESS RELEASE ON FACEBOOK BECAUSE FACEBOOK KICKED ME OUT ! ! !

PRESS RELEASE & ANNOUNCEMENT
by Cris Ericson, 2018 candidate for U.S. Congress
http://www.crisericson.com

80,000 POT HEADS PROTEST &
DEMONSTRATION JUNE 21, 2017
ON THE STATE HOUSE LAWN
IN MONTPELIER, VERMONT

80,000 pot heads will convince state legislators to
MAKE MARIJUANA LEGAL
by protesting the governor’s veto and holding up signs
that say, “MAKE MARIJUANA LEGAL” during the
MARIJUANA DEMONSTRATION, MONTPELIER, VERMONT
JUNE 21, 2017 on the State House Lawn
POST ON YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA RIGHT AWAY!

PROTEST THE GOVERNOR’S VETO OF MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION
BY DEMONSTRATING WITH SIGNS TO TELL YOUR REPRESENTATIVES
TO OVER-RIDE THE GOVERNOR’S VETO ON JUNE 21, 2017
ON THE STATE HOUSE LAWN IN MONTPELIER, VERMONT.

JUNE 21, 2017 MONTPELIER, VT STATEHOUSE
VERMONT PRO-MARIJUANA DEMONSTRATION:
BRING SIGNS ASKING LEGISLATORS to VOTE
to OVER-RIDE VERMONT GOVERNOR PHIL SCOTT’S
VETO of RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA S. 22 BILL
in this June 21, 2017 VETO SESSION, a joint
session of all Vermont State Representatives
and Vermont State Senators voting yes or no
to OVER-RIDE VT GOVERNOR SCOTT’S
VETO of RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA!
MAKE MARIJUANA LEGAL
MARIJUANA DEMONSTRATION, MONTPELIER, VERMONT
JUNE 21, 2017 on the State House Lawn
POST ON YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA RIGHT AWAY!

BRING YOUR OWN BEVERAGES,
SNACKS, SANDWICHES, BLANKETS,
SIGNS, POSTERS, etc. & FRIENDS!
If you are bringing over 10 people in your
group, then call Nancy McAvoy,
Dept. of Buildings & General Services
(802)828-1506 or (802)249-1417
and ask for a form to fill out.
The Vermont State House Lawn is
public property, but they like to know when
you have over 10 people in your group.
PLEASE SHARE THIS MESSAGE ON
ALL OF YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA RIGHT AWAY!
I HOPE TO SEE YOU ALL THERE!
http://www.crisericson.com
https://crisericson.wordpress.com
U.S. MARIJUANA PARTY
http://usmjparty.com

If it is raining, bring umbrellas and
plastic table cloths to sit on.
Paint your signs with acrylic paint
which should be fine in the rain.

MAKE MARIJUANA LEGAL
MARIJUANA DEMONSTRATION, MONTPELIER, VERMONT
JUNE 21, 2017 on the State House Lawn

TAKE YOUR OLD, PLAIN T-SHIRT AND PAINT
MARIJUANA DESIGNS ON IT,
AND DO THIS FOR YOUR FRIENDS, TOO!!!
You can make stencils by drawing
pictures of marijuana on poster board
and carefully cutting them out,
and then lay the stencil on a plain t-shirt
and use a brush to carefully paint in the
marijuana with green acrylic paint.

Common “Exterior House Paint” is best
for painting t-shirts. Ask your friends
to bring you their old plain colored t-shirts
because with common exterior house paint,
you can paint the marijuana plant over any
color, black, white, any color plain t-shirt.

If you have an air brush and compressor,
use the common exterior house paint, and go
to a thrift store and buy every plain t-shirt you
can afford for 50 cents and hand them out
“for donations” to your as yet un-incorporated
non-profit, or established non-profit organization.
This is the only way I know of to make hundreds
of t-shirts for less than a dollar a t-shirt total cost.
Remember, we are hoping 80,000 Vermont pot heads
will show up!

You can buy a gallon or a half gallon
of green acrylic paint at the hardware store
and paint hundreds of t-shirts with stencils,
using a brush to paint a plain t-shirt.
Acrylic paint on cotton t-shirts
dries reasonably fast, especially if hung
out on a clothes line in the sun.

Then, you can wash the t-shirt in a washing
machine and put it in a dryer, and the
acrylic painted design stays just great!
This is a fabulous way of making a lot
of t-shirts! You can even make a
separate stencil for the “bud” or flower of
the marijuana plant, and use a different
color, and paint a hundred t-shirts
with the green, then go back and paint
the “bud” or flower a different color on them.

PROTEST THE GOVERNOR’S VETO OF MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION
BY DEMONSTRATING WITH SIGNS TO TELL YOUR REPRESENTATIVES
TO OVER-RIDE THE GOVERNOR’S VETO ON JUNE 21, 2017
ON THE STATE HOUSE LAWN IN MONTPELIER, VERMONT.

Please share this message on all of your
social media! Remember, CRIS ERICSON has been kicked
out of facebook, so she depends on you
to spread the word and get people to show up!

Remember, if you are bringing ten or more people,
fill out a form for Nancy McAvoy
(802)828-1506 Vermont State Dept. of
Buildings and General Services, and if the
form requires a name for your group, put
something like, “80,000 Pot Heads”.

MAKE MARIJUANA LEGAL
MARIJUANA DEMONSTRATION, MONTPELIER, VERMONT
JUNE 21, 2017 on the State House Lawn

PLEASE POST THIS TO YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA RIGHT AWAY!!!!!
DEMONSTRATION TO OVER-RIDE GOVERNOR’S VETO OF
RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA LAW ON JUNE 21, 2017
COME EARLY, BRING FOOD AND PLASTIC PICNIC TABLECLOTH
TO SIT ON!

PROTEST THE GOVERNOR’S VETO OF MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION
BY DEMONSTRATING WITH SIGNS TO TELL YOUR REPRESENTATIVES
TO OVER-RIDE THE GOVERNOR’S VETO ON JUNE 21, 2017
ON THE STATE HOUSE LAWN IN MONTPELIER, VERMONT.

CRIS ERICSON, TEXT MESSAGES ONLY
1-802-289-1000
crisericson2016@gmail.com
http://www.crisericson.com
https://crisericson.wordpress.com
UNITED STATES MARIJUANA PARTY IN VERMONT
MAKE MARIJUANA LEGAL

YOU CAN PUT THE UNITED STATES MARIJUANA PARTY ON THE BALLOT IN UTAH 2017

YOU CAN PUT THE UNITED STATES MARIJUANA PARTY
ON THE BALLOT IN UTAH 2017 !!!
PLEASE FORWARD THIS AND SHARE THIS WITH ALL OF
YOUR FRIENDS IN UTAH !!!

YOU CAN GET ON THE ELECTION BALLOT IN UTAH NOW !!!
U.S. CONGRESSMAN CHAFFETZ IS RESIGNING EARLY AND
THERE IS AN ELECTION TO REPLACE HIM !!!
HELP MAKE MARIJUANA LEGAL
BY RUNNING
FOR U.S. CONGRESS, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
IN THE STATE OF UTAH 2017 !!!

2017 UNAFFILIATED
UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
CERTIFICATE OF NOMINATION

of_________________________________________________
(print name exactly as it is to be printed on the official
ballot – no amendments or modifications after June 12, 2017) for the office of United States Representativ
for the Third Congressional District.
State of Utah
County of
ss.
I, ____________________ , declare my intention of becoming
an unaffiliated candidate for the political group designated as

Medical marijuana patient wins employment discrimination suit in Rhode Island

 

This April 15, 2017 file photo shows marijuana plants on display at a medical marijuana provider in downtown Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

 

By Andrew Blake – The Washington Times – Wednesday, May 24, 2017

A Rhode Island fabrics company violated the state’s medical marijuana law when it refused to hire a card-carrying patient who couldn’t pass a drug test, a state Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday.

Christine Callaghan sued Darlington Fabrics Corp. for compensatory and punitive damages in 2014 after the company said her medical marijuana usage precluded it from offering her a paid internship position while she pursued a master’s degree at the University of Rhode Island. Ms. Callaghan promised not to bring weed into the workplace or arrive for work stoned, but Darlington said her failure to pass a pre-employment drug test prohibited her hiring, according to court filings.

In a 32-page ruling Tuesday, Associate Justice Richard A. Licht said Darlington broke the state’s Hawkins-Slater Medical Marijuana Act by rejecting Ms. Callaghan because she legally uses pot to treat migraine headaches in accodance with state law.

“Employment is neither a right nor a privilege in the legal sense,” Judge Licht ruled, but protection under the law is, he added.

While employers aren’t required to accommodate the medical use of cannabis in the workplace under Hawkins-Slater, the ruling noted, the law specifies that “no school, employer or landlord may refuse to reenroll, employ or lease to or otherwise penalize, a person solely for his or her status as a cardholder.”

Darlington had argued that it rejected Ms. Callaghan not because her status as a medical marijuana cardholder but her inability to pass a drug test. The judge called his claim “incredulous” in Tuesday’s ruling and took aim at its interpretation of the state’s medical marijuana law.

“This argument is not convincing,” he wrote, adding: “…it is absurd to think that the General Assembly wished to extend less protection to those suffering with debilitating conditions and who are the focus of the [act].”

“The recreational user could cease smoking long enough to pass the drug test and get hired… allowing him or her to smoke recreationally to his or her heart’s content,” he continued. “The medical user, however, would not be able to cease for long enough to pass the drug test, even though his or her use is necessary…”

More than 17,000 Rhode Islanders are currently members of the state’s medical marijuana program, the Providence Journal reported. While most of those individuals are patients who use marijuana to treat covered medical conditions, that number also includes people categorized as official “caregivers,” the newspaper reported.

“This decision sends a strong message that people with disabilities simply cannot be denied equal employment opportunities because of the medication they take,” Carly Beauvais Iafrate, a volunteer American Civil Liberties Union attorney and Ms. Callaghan’s legal counsel, said in a statement after Tuesday’s ruling.

Darlington plans to appeal the ruling before the state Supreme Court, defense attorney Meghan Siket told the Journal. Neither the company nor its lawyer was immediately available to comment Tuesday, the Associated Press reported.

Medical marijuana laws are currently on the books in 29 states and Washington, D.C., including Rhode Island, notwithstanding the federal government’s prohibition on pot.

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Vermont lawmakers become first to approve legal pot

AP MARIJUANA STATES OF PLAY A FILE USA CA

April McCullum, The Burlington (Vt.) Free Press

MONTPELIER, Vt. — Vermont’s Legislature become the first in the nation Wednesday to approve a recreational marijuana legalization bill.

Vermont’s bill, which would legalize small amounts of marijuana possession in 2018 and anticipate the possibility of a taxed and regulated legal marijuana market, was approved in the Vermont House of Representatives on Wednesday afternoon by a vote of 79-66. The state Senate already passed the bill, so it will go directly to GOP Gov. Phil Scott.

Eight states — Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon and Washington — and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana following a voter referendum, but no state yet has legalized marijuana solely through the legislative process, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Legalization advocates said bills were pending in other state legislatures.

“I think it reflects that Vermont elected officials are more in touch with our constituents than a lot of elected officials in other states,” said Vermont Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman, a member of the Vermont Progressive Party who has worked on marijuana issues for the majority of his political career. “I think the public is ahead of us, but elected officials tend to be cautious when it comes to change.”

Wednesday’s vote closed a debate over legalization, particularly in the state House. The divisiveness once prompted Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe, a Democrat from Burlington, Vt., to predict that legalization would take a miracle to pass this year.

Advocates hugged and shared high-fives outside the two chambers after the vote.

“Vermont elected officials are more in touch with our constituents than a lot of elected officials in other states.”

Earlier in the day, the House Judiciary Committee voted 8-3 to support the limited bill, which was pitched as a compromise between the House and Senate approaches on marijuana.

The proposal incorporates H.170, a House-supported bill that would legalize possession of up to one ounce of marijuana, two mature marijuana plants or four immature marijuana plants for adults older than 21. The effective date was pushed to July 1, 2018.

The bill also sets up a nine-member commission to study the best way to regulate marijuana.

“There’s no slam dunk of any kind,” Rep. Barbara Rachelson, a Burlington Democrat, said about the prospect of a legal marijuana market. “It just is doing work that could be used next year or in subsequent years.”

The proposal would continue to prohibit driving under the influence of marijuana and the use of marijuana in public places. Employers, landlords, schools and prisons could continue to restrict marijuana use.

“The data indicates that our youth are using marijuana more infrequently, and I don’t think we should put that in jeopardy,” said GOP Rep. Scott Beck of St. Johnsbury, Vt., who voted against the bill.

Democratic Rep. Susan Buckholz of Hartford, Vt., said declining marijuana use among the state’s high school students, measured at 37% in the latest Vermont Youth Risk Behavior Survey, shows that anti-drug education is working.

“We need to make a move to be treating this as a public health issue for those for whom it is a health issue and letting other people use this substance responsibly,” Buckholz said.

Vermont's House minority leader, GOP Rep. Don Turner

Vermont’s House minority leader, GOP Rep. Don Turner of Milton, speaks May 10, 2017, against a marijuana legalization bill at the Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt. (Photo: Glenn Russell, The Burlington (Vt.) Free Press)

If Scott signs the bill, a new commission would be responsible for drafting a system to tax and regulate marijuana and submitting the plan to the Legislature. The end result would need to be a marijuana regulatory system that  “increases public safety and reduces harm to public health.”

“The administration will be at the table, along with the attorney general and others,” said Democratic Rep. Maxine Grad of Moretown, Vt., chairwoman of the House Judiciary Committee. “With Massachusetts and Maine starting up in 2018, I think we need to continue this conversation.”

Scott repeatedly has expressed concerns about marijuana and highway safety. He has the choice to sign the bill, veto the bill, or allow it to become law without his signature.

The first-term Republican governor declined to say before Wednesday’s House vote whether he would veto the legislation.

“I don’t believe this is a priority for Vermont,” Scott said. “I believe that what we should be doing is trying to find ways to protect those on our highways, deliver a level of impairment that is consistent throughout the Northeast, as well as to address the edibles for our kids before we move forward with legalization. Having said that, I’m going to review the bill as it’s passed.”

Follow April McCullum on Twitter: @April_McCullum

Note: Vermont legislators changed the effective date of the bill below to July 1, 2018.

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PDF OF H 170 AND VIDEO

Vermont Senate Approves Bill to Regulate Marijuana for Adult Use and Eliminate Penalties for Home Cultivation

April 21, 2017
Press Release

News State by State: Vermont

[Press Release] MONTPELIER, Vt. — The Vermont Senate approved a bill on Friday that would regulate the production and sale of marijuana and eliminate penalties for personal possession and cultivation by adults 21 and older.

The Senate amended H. 167, an unrelated House-approved bill, to replace it with a revised version of a marijuana regulation bill that passed last year in the Senate and failed in the House. The Senate also amended H. 167 to include the same home cultivation provision that is included in H. 170, a bill that has been making its way through the House. H. 170 would eliminate Vermont’s civil penalty for possessing one ounce or less of marijuana and remove penalties for possession of up to two mature marijuana plants and up to four immature plants. The Senate proposal would allow unlimited small-scale cultivation licenses for producers no larger than 500 sq feet. The marijuana regulation bill that failed in the House last year, S. 241, did not include a home cultivation provision.

The Senate-amended version of H. 167 will receive one final vote before being sent back to the House for consideration.

Most Vermont voters are in favor of the policy changes proposed in H. 167 and H. 170, according to a survey conducted March 20-21 by Public Policy Polling. Fifty-seven percent support allowing adults 21 and older to possess and grow limited amounts of marijuana, and 54% support regulating and taxing marijuana similarly to alcohol. The results are available at https://www.mpp.org/VTpoll.

Statement from Matt Simon, New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project:
“Most Vermonters think marijuana should be made legal for adults, and they’re looking to lawmakers to come up with a plan. We applaud the Senate for approving a thoughtful alternative to marijuana prohibition that would account for public health and improve public safety. We would love to see the House step up and join the Senate in supporting this sensible reform. If the House isn’t willing to support the Senate’s proposal, it at least needs to support its own Judiciary Committee’s plan and pass H. 170.”

The Vermont Coalition to Regulate Marijuana is a broad coalition of citizens, organizations, and businesses working to end marijuana prohibition in Vermont and replace it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed. For more information, visit http://www.RegulateVermont.org

Vermont image: iStock.com

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TRUMP’S DHS CHIEF JUST FLIPPED! WHAT HE SAID ABOUT THE WAR ON DRUGS IS GAME-CHANGING!

 

Untitled

The Next News Network

Published on Apr 18, 2017

MORE INFO: http://CannaSense.com | Email Jordan jpage@cannasense.com | Sub for more: http://nnn.is/the_new_media | Eliot Nelson for the Huffington Post reports, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly said that marijuana “is not a factor in the drug war,” placing him at odds with a number of other Trump administration officials.
Take action MORE INFO: http://CannaSense.com
Email Jordan jpage@cannasense.com
See the report here:
https://youtu.be/LM-f3qlRYMM
ref:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/j…
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CONTINUE TO VIDEO!!!

DoJ Task Force Moves to Review Federal Cannabis Policy

In a DoJ memo, AG Jeff Sessions called for a subcommittee on marijuana and an email shows the DEA inquiring about Colorado cases.

By Aaron G. Biros

In a memo sent throughout the Department of Justice on April 5th, attorney general Jeff Sessions outlines the establishment of the Department’s Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety. That task force, largely focused on violent crime, is supposed to find ways that federal prosecutors can more effectively reduce illegal immigration, violent crimes and gun violence.

The task force is made up of subcommittees, according to the memo, and one of them is focused on reviewing federal cannabis policy. “Task Force subcommittees will also undertake a review of existing policies in the areas of charging, sentencing, and marijuana to ensure consistency with the Department’s overall strategy on reducing violent crime and with Administration goals and priorities,” the memo reads. “Another subcommittee will explore our use of asset forfeiture and make recommendations on any improvements needed to legal authorities, policies, and training to most effectively attack the financial infrastructure of criminal organizations.” Those existing policies that Sessions refers to in the memo could very well be the 2013 Cole Memorandum, an Obama administration decree that essentially set up a framework for states with legal cannabis laws to avoid federal enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act.

In the past, Sessions has said he thinks the Cole Memo is valid, but remains skeptical of medical cannabis. In the last several months, comments made by Sessions and White House press secretary Sean Spicer have sparked outrage and growing fears among stakeholders in the cannabis industry, including major business players and state lawmakers. As a general feeling of uncertainty surrounding federal cannabis policy grows, many are looking for a safe haven, which could mean looking to markets outside of the U.S., like Canada, for example.

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL)
Photo: Gage Skidmore, Flickr

Washington State’s former Attorney General Rob McKenna, Washington State’s former Chief Deputy Attorney General Brian Moran, and Maryland’s former Chief Deputy Attorney General Kay Winfree recently went on the record identifying the BioTrack THC traceability system as fully compliant with the Cole Memo. “The key to meeting the requirements of the Cole Memorandum is ‘both the existence of a strong and effective state regulatory system, and an operation’s compliance with that system’,” says the former attorney general and chief deputy attorneys general in a press release. “As described above, Washington State has a robust, comprehensive regulatory scheme that controls the entire marijuana supply chain.

The email sent to Colorado prosecutor Michael Melito

The flagship component of this regulatory scheme is the WSLCB’s seed to sale inventory system, the BioTrackTHC Traceability System.” Those commendations from a former attorney general could provide some solace to business operating with the seed-to-sale traceability software.

Still though, worries in the industry are fueled by speculation and a general lack of clarity from the Trump Administration and the Department of Justice. In an email obtained by an open records request and first reported by the International Business Times, a DEA supervisor asked a Colorado prosecutor in the state attorney general’s office about a number of cannabis-related prosecutions. The DEA supervisor asked for the state docket numbers of a handful of cases, including one involving cannabis being shipped out of state, according to The Denver Post. “Some of our intel people are trying to track down info regarding some of DEA’s better marijuana investigations for the new administration,” reads the email. “Hopefully it will lead to some positive changes.” So far, only speculations have emerged pertaining to its significance or lack thereof and what this could possibly mean for the future of federal cannabis policy.

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