All posts by ShereeKrider

U.S. Marijuana Party - Organizer U.S. Marijuana Party Kentucky Sheree Krider, LLC Cave City, Kentucky 42127 270-834-7332

Vermont Senate Approves Bill to Regulate Marijuana for Adult Use and Eliminate Penalties for Home Cultivation

April 21, 2017
Press Release

News State by State: Vermont

[Press Release] MONTPELIER, Vt. — The Vermont Senate approved a bill on Friday that would regulate the production and sale of marijuana and eliminate penalties for personal possession and cultivation by adults 21 and older.

The Senate amended H. 167, an unrelated House-approved bill, to replace it with a revised version of a marijuana regulation bill that passed last year in the Senate and failed in the House. The Senate also amended H. 167 to include the same home cultivation provision that is included in H. 170, a bill that has been making its way through the House. H. 170 would eliminate Vermont’s civil penalty for possessing one ounce or less of marijuana and remove penalties for possession of up to two mature marijuana plants and up to four immature plants. The Senate proposal would allow unlimited small-scale cultivation licenses for producers no larger than 500 sq feet. The marijuana regulation bill that failed in the House last year, S. 241, did not include a home cultivation provision.

The Senate-amended version of H. 167 will receive one final vote before being sent back to the House for consideration.

Most Vermont voters are in favor of the policy changes proposed in H. 167 and H. 170, according to a survey conducted March 20-21 by Public Policy Polling. Fifty-seven percent support allowing adults 21 and older to possess and grow limited amounts of marijuana, and 54% support regulating and taxing marijuana similarly to alcohol. The results are available at https://www.mpp.org/VTpoll.

Statement from Matt Simon, New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project:
“Most Vermonters think marijuana should be made legal for adults, and they’re looking to lawmakers to come up with a plan. We applaud the Senate for approving a thoughtful alternative to marijuana prohibition that would account for public health and improve public safety. We would love to see the House step up and join the Senate in supporting this sensible reform. If the House isn’t willing to support the Senate’s proposal, it at least needs to support its own Judiciary Committee’s plan and pass H. 170.”

The Vermont Coalition to Regulate Marijuana is a broad coalition of citizens, organizations, and businesses working to end marijuana prohibition in Vermont and replace it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed. For more information, visit http://www.RegulateVermont.org

Vermont image: iStock.com

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TRUMP’S DHS CHIEF JUST FLIPPED! WHAT HE SAID ABOUT THE WAR ON DRUGS IS GAME-CHANGING!

 

Untitled

The Next News Network

Published on Apr 18, 2017

MORE INFO: http://CannaSense.com | Email Jordan jpage@cannasense.com | Sub for more: http://nnn.is/the_new_media | Eliot Nelson for the Huffington Post reports, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly said that marijuana “is not a factor in the drug war,” placing him at odds with a number of other Trump administration officials.
Take action MORE INFO: http://CannaSense.com
Email Jordan jpage@cannasense.com
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https://youtu.be/LM-f3qlRYMM
ref:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/j…
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Copyright Disclaimer: Citation of articles and authors in this report does not imply ownership. Works and images presented here fall under Fair Use Section 107 and are used for commentary on globally significant newsworthy events. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

CONTINUE TO VIDEO!!!

DoJ Task Force Moves to Review Federal Cannabis Policy

In a DoJ memo, AG Jeff Sessions called for a subcommittee on marijuana and an email shows the DEA inquiring about Colorado cases.

By Aaron G. Biros

In a memo sent throughout the Department of Justice on April 5th, attorney general Jeff Sessions outlines the establishment of the Department’s Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety. That task force, largely focused on violent crime, is supposed to find ways that federal prosecutors can more effectively reduce illegal immigration, violent crimes and gun violence.

The task force is made up of subcommittees, according to the memo, and one of them is focused on reviewing federal cannabis policy. “Task Force subcommittees will also undertake a review of existing policies in the areas of charging, sentencing, and marijuana to ensure consistency with the Department’s overall strategy on reducing violent crime and with Administration goals and priorities,” the memo reads. “Another subcommittee will explore our use of asset forfeiture and make recommendations on any improvements needed to legal authorities, policies, and training to most effectively attack the financial infrastructure of criminal organizations.” Those existing policies that Sessions refers to in the memo could very well be the 2013 Cole Memorandum, an Obama administration decree that essentially set up a framework for states with legal cannabis laws to avoid federal enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act.

In the past, Sessions has said he thinks the Cole Memo is valid, but remains skeptical of medical cannabis. In the last several months, comments made by Sessions and White House press secretary Sean Spicer have sparked outrage and growing fears among stakeholders in the cannabis industry, including major business players and state lawmakers. As a general feeling of uncertainty surrounding federal cannabis policy grows, many are looking for a safe haven, which could mean looking to markets outside of the U.S., like Canada, for example.

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL)
Photo: Gage Skidmore, Flickr

Washington State’s former Attorney General Rob McKenna, Washington State’s former Chief Deputy Attorney General Brian Moran, and Maryland’s former Chief Deputy Attorney General Kay Winfree recently went on the record identifying the BioTrack THC traceability system as fully compliant with the Cole Memo. “The key to meeting the requirements of the Cole Memorandum is ‘both the existence of a strong and effective state regulatory system, and an operation’s compliance with that system’,” says the former attorney general and chief deputy attorneys general in a press release. “As described above, Washington State has a robust, comprehensive regulatory scheme that controls the entire marijuana supply chain.

The email sent to Colorado prosecutor Michael Melito

The flagship component of this regulatory scheme is the WSLCB’s seed to sale inventory system, the BioTrackTHC Traceability System.” Those commendations from a former attorney general could provide some solace to business operating with the seed-to-sale traceability software.

Still though, worries in the industry are fueled by speculation and a general lack of clarity from the Trump Administration and the Department of Justice. In an email obtained by an open records request and first reported by the International Business Times, a DEA supervisor asked a Colorado prosecutor in the state attorney general’s office about a number of cannabis-related prosecutions. The DEA supervisor asked for the state docket numbers of a handful of cases, including one involving cannabis being shipped out of state, according to The Denver Post. “Some of our intel people are trying to track down info regarding some of DEA’s better marijuana investigations for the new administration,” reads the email. “Hopefully it will lead to some positive changes.” So far, only speculations have emerged pertaining to its significance or lack thereof and what this could possibly mean for the future of federal cannabis policy.

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I’m a professional making over $100k a year and I smoke lots of high-grade marijuana every single day. Is this unusual? Are there others like me?

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Hello, I just found this post, and I couldn’t help myself but to add a comment!

I have used Cannabis all of my adult life and am grateful for it. I have major depression and anxiety along with other health problems which I wont elaborate on here. However, none of them were caused by Cannabis and most came before it.

I am not an “educated” person, as I only have a High School Diploma. I worked in clerical/secretarial/office positions until I was 33 full time and after that part time and I also had 2 children. I learned a lot from working – that is where most of my education came.

With that meager education I managed to bring together a little piece of the World called – “The U.S. Marijuana Party”. I own and maintain the websites and am the organizer. I have 20+ blogs, websites which “Fight for the Freedom from Prohibition of Your Freedoms”!!!

I obtained the Trademarks to U.S. Marijuana Party as well as ShereeKrider in 2015.

NO, I do not make any money at this. At least I haven’t yet. But that was never the reason for doing any of this. It was a belief and the fact that I care for people, about people and about what happens to them. I like to say what I believe and this has given me the way to do that.

Maybe, at some point, there will come a time when there will be money made for me but I’m not banking on that. If I did start to get an income from it I would make it easier to help a few people!

My point in telling you all this is that not all success in this life can be measured by the amount of money that you make. Success is when you succeed at accomplishing something that helps make the world a little bit better, or help someone who needs it.

As far as successful potheads go I think Marc Emery had a good go of it – If only he had stopped while he was ahead!

God Bless Them – There’s nothing like a successful Cannabis business person!

Myself, I’m holding out for REPEAL OF PROHIBITION!

ShereeKrider


Anonymous

Updated Jan 27, 2014

Many, many people live just like you.  There always have been, and there always will be.  I’ve known highly paid, highly functioning, and highly regarded bankers, corporate lawyers, and professors just like you.
I was in the same situation just 6 months ago.  Of course, there are plenty of people who have more than 3 or 4 drinks every day, and those people are not judged nearly as harshly — if at all — by most societies.  Social and cultural convention can be funny and at times seemingly arbitrary.  In Singapore, for instance, the law on the books is death by hanging for drug use/sale.  In Hong Kong, it’s 7 years in jail though that’s not strictly enforced, and it’s not too difficult to get — though quality isn’t up to par with the States.
Like frequent enjoyment of any pleasure, pros and cons will differ by individual, but it’s definitely not a terrible life.
Here were my pros and cons before I quit for good many months ago:
From: Dave Cheng’s answer to What’s it like to be a heavy user of marijuana on a regular basis?

Benefits:

  • The single biggest advantage to drug addiction is best described in Get Him to the Greek: it makes everything else insignificant.  All of your worries and concerns are replaced by: “when can I get high?”  This sounds terrible but can actually be fantastic.  If I have weed, I don’t feel the need to have plans every weekend and am not terribly disappointed if plans fall through.  If something better than getting stoned by myself comes up, great, but no big deal if not.
  • Instant relief for stress and pain, both mental and physical
  • Enhancement of physical pleasures.  I am high for more than half my waking hours, and I really enjoy being high.  This, like most subjective experiences, will differ based on the individual, strand, social and cultural context, etc. but for me, food tastes better, music sounds better, movies and TV are more enjoyable, books are more engaging, and most other things just seem more interesting.
  • Can aid in creativity and focus in the right situation.  Most of my Quora answers have been written while high.
  • Lowers inhibitions (e.g., more likely to open up to friends or random strangers on Quora about your weed habit)
  • Makes time pass faster by keeping you relaxed and entertained (albeit mildly) during moments of boredom and/or frustration.
  • Like all other hobbies, especially illicit ones, it lets you make friends with those who share your proclivities.  The same way being a nicotine addict gives you the excuse to go outside for air and meet your fellow smokers outside of bars.  There is an instant camaraderie and an “us vs. the squares” mentality.
  • Guilty thrill in having a (mostly) harmless secret from coworkers, friends, lovers, and family.  Possessing a part of yourself that most people will never glimpse.  Before sharing this on Quora, only 3-5 people in the world would have suspected the depths of my habit.  Those ~5 people do not include my wife or any of my family members, some of whom know I smoke but would not have come close to guessing how often.
  • Social and personal perception (i.e., self-identifying) as: anti-establishment, anti-convention, laid-back, peaceful, pleasure-seeking and life-loving

Costs:

  • Social stigma and negative stereotypes: a lot of people are going to judge based on their preconceived notions.  Social and personal perception as: lazy, unmotivated, lacking in discipline and self-control, directionless, hedonistic, nihilistic
  • Stress and hassle associated with keeping your secret from coworkers, friends, lovers, and family.  Lying to the people you are closest to and then feeling less close to them because you have to lie to them.
  • Risk of legal punishment and/or social disgrace
  • Depending on the strand and situation, occasionally can lead to increased anxiety and slight paranoia (not as acute or as often for me nowadays as when I first began smoking)
  • Lowers inhibitions (e.g., more likely to snack or watch TV to excess)
  • Severely impaired performance for: social interactions, physically-demanding activities, mentally-demanding activities that require intense focus and coherence.  While high, I find it much more difficult (though not impossible) to: mingle with unfamiliar people; jog or lift weights; and design/create new excel spreadsheets without a good model or template.
  • Getting bored more easily when sober (i.e., this is interesting but I could be stoned right now).  Becoming a more boring person as a result (boredom is boring).
  • Food, entertainment, and special occasions while sober seem less special and less enjoyable by comparison.  Pleasure and pain are relative.  Whenever I enjoy a mind-blowingly great meal, movie, or session of intercourse while sober, a small part of me regrets not being high for it.
  • When you are smoking a lot, each time you get high is less special
  • Pot hangovers.  While not nearly as bad as alcohol-induced ones, there is a general grogginess/haziness that can be long-lasting
  • Temporary damage to mental and physical health (unless we’re talking about lungs depending on how you’re smoking, in which case: possibly permanent damage)
  • Risk of addiction, albeit less than alcohol and many other drugs
  • You want things less.  Nothing is that big of a deal because in a few hours, you can still go get high and have a great time.  It’s ok if there’s nothing in the fridge or no time to cook because the most mediocre take-out in the world will taste fantastic if I smoke enough beforehand.

Full background in original answer: Dave Cheng’s answer to What’s it like to be a heavy user of marijuana on a regular basis?

 

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Teen denied double-lung transplant after smoking marijuana

Riley Hancey, 19, was denied a double-lung transplant because of his marijuana use. (Source: KSL via CNN)

 

Salt Lake City, UT (KSL/CNN) — Up until Thanksgiving, Riley Hancey led a pretty normal life; the 19-year-old was an avid skier, river runner and biker. But then a severe form of pneumonia left him with failing lungs and nowhere to turn for help.

Within 10 days of being hospitalized, Riley Hancey’s lungs collapsed and his doctors told him he needed a double-lung transplant to live.

But Mark Hancey, Riley Hancey’s father, said because his son tested positive for THC – the chief intoxicant in marijuana – he was denied a spot on the transplant list at University of Utah Hospital.

“Riley did smoke marijuana on Thanksgiving night with his friends,” Mark Hancey, told KSL Monday. “It’s not like he’s a smoker for 30 years and (had) deteriorating lungs because of that.”

In fact, Mark Hancey said his son had been drug-free for a year prior to his illness.

Officials at the University of Utah could not talk specifically about Riley’s case, but they issued a written statement to KSL saying University Hospital follows international guidelines for transplants and evaluates cases individually.

“We do not transplant organs in patients with active alcohol, tobacco or illicit drug use or dependencies until these issues are addressed, as these substances are contraindicated for a transplant,” the statement said.

Age and other medical conditions may also exclude patients from the list, the statement said.

According to Mark Hancey, a doctor told his son, “You will die. You better get your affairs in order,” and the young man broke down in tears.

Family members set about scouring the country for a hospital willing to do the transplant. Two months ago, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania agreed.

Mark Hancey said his son was flown to Philadelphia on medical transport.

“I looked at Riley and I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, this poor soul looks like death,'” Mark Hancey said.

Twelve days ago, doctors gave Riley Hancey two donor lungs.

“He looked so healthy,” Mark Hancey said. “It made all the difference, and he still looks healthy. … He still fighting, and he’s doing well.”

Riley Hancey remained under sedation Monday and hasn’t communicated a lot with anyone yet. Mark Hancey said his son will recover at the hospital in Philadelphia for a year, with family members visiting for support.

Mark Hancey said doctors are optimistic that Riley Hancey will be able to return to many of his favorite activities after a lot of recovery.

CONTINUE READING…

Godfather of Marijuana Sent from Vermont to Kentucky to be Prosecuted for Growing Marijuana!

Vermont Marijuana News
April 6, 2017

NEWS LINKS:

http://www.mynbc5.com/article/godfather-of-grass-deported-to-us-to-face-federal-pot-charges/9241436

http://harlandaily.com/news/18260/news-in-brief-266

Summary of Information on this subject:

John Robert “Johnny” Boone, 73 ,was convicted in the 1980s and is known as the Godfather of Grass. The Godfather of Grass disappeared almost a decade ago while federal agents were closing in on him.

Johnny Boone had already spent a decade in prison; isn’t that enough?

He was deported from Canada to Burlington, Vermont on Wednesday April 5, 2017 and will be held in a Vermont prison pending his return to Kentucky to face federal marijuana charges.

The authorities claim he was head of a mafia that had 29 farms in 9 states. He fled to Canada after an indictment in 2008.

John Robert Boone originates from rural Kentucky near Louisville, an area that used to grow Hemp Farms, legally!

Also, marijuana used to be legal in the U.S.A.
It is a crime against nature and the Holy Bible Old Testament to prosecute people for a plant that God gave us.

Johnny Boone was featured on the TV show “America’s Most Wanted” and sparked a Facebook page called Run, Johnny, Run.

John Robert Boone grew 2,400 marijuana plants on his central Kentucky farm. That would NOT have been a crime when our Country was started and marijuana and hemp were legal!

Please note that Cris Ericson’s grandfather, George Robert Ericson, was born on the Hemp Lawn Farm on the Benson Pike in Shelbyville, Kentucky in 1898 when marijuana and hemp were legal in the United States of America! Shelbyville is near Louisville, Kentucky.

2018 Vote for Cris Ericson for United States Congress in Vermont http://www.crisericson.com

She formed the U.S. Marijuana Party in 2002; ran for Alabama governor in 2006 on a platform to legalize pot; created the Alabama Compassionate Care group to fight for use of marijuana for treatment of disease; and in 2010 was named by the magazine Skunk as one of the top 100 most influential women in Cannabis…

Pushing for legalization: Alabama housewife to marijuana activist

https://i2.wp.com/www.tokeofthetown.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Loretta20Nall20crop20842983049_l.jpg

By Kent Faulk | kfaulk@al.com
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on March 29, 2017 at 7:31 AM, updated March 29, 2017 at 10:20 AM

Loretta Nall remembers the first time she smoked marijuana.

“I was about 12 years old at a Ratt/Queensreich concert at the BJCC (Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Complex),” Nall, who grew up in the east Alabama town of Ashland, said in an interview with AL.com.

That was 30 years ago and since then Nall has become one of the most outspoken advocates for the legalization of pot in the nation.

She formed the U.S. Marijuana Party in 2002; ran for Alabama governor in 2006 on a platform to legalize pot; created the Alabama Compassionate Care group to fight for use of marijuana for treatment of disease; and in 2010 was named by the magazine Skunk as one of the top 100 most influential women in Cannabis.

Nall says she wasn’t always an activist and there were periods when she didn’t smoke weed – particularly when she was pregnant with her two children.

Until 2002, Nall had been a housewife and mother with only a few minor traffic violations, hadn’t thought about running for office, and wasn’t public in her outcry for the legalization of pot. But two things happened that year that would change that.

It was in 2002 that she connected online with Marc Emery, dubbed Canada’s “Prince of Pot.”

Nall said that in 2002 Emery asked her to come up to Canada and meet. “Within a week of my returning I had helicopters buzzing my house and (police on) ATVs in my yard,” she said.

Law enforcement told her they saw marijuana growing on her property, Nall said. But there wasn’t any, she said.

Nall believes that law enforcement converged on her property because she had visited Emery, who she said was near the top of federal drug agents’ watch list.

At that time, however, police didn’t try to search her house – at least not right away.

Soon after the raid, Nall sent a letter to the editor at The Birmingham News pushing for legalization of pot. It was titled: “Going to pot, and so what?” She wrote that not all marijuana users fit the “stereotypical stoner-without-a-clue image.”

Lobbying against sin: Baptist leader ready to fight marijuana

The Rev. Joe Godfrey is Alabama’s point man when it comes to lobbying against sin.

“We are not criminals who rob, steal or otherwise cause harm to the fabric of society, and it is time to stop treating us as if we were,” Nall wrote in 2002, long before states began to break with federal prohibitions on recreational marijuana. “It is time to demand an end to cannabis prohibition and the harsh drug laws that do more harm to society than the drug itself will ever do. It is time for change.” 

Six days after that letter to the editor appeared police returned with a search warrant, finding rolling papers, a scale and 0.87 grams of marijuana inside her mobile home.

“I think I was the first one to get the media’s attention (for pot legalization),” Nall said. “They (police) turned me into an activist by raiding my home and trying to take my children and violating my first amendment rights.”

Loretta Nall: Alabama Marijuana Advocate

A Tallapoosa County Sheriff’s investigator who had secured the search warrant for Nall’s home denied after the raid that the warrant was based on Nall’s letter to the editor. “Of course, it didn’t help her out any,” said the investigator, who would not say where the information for the search warrant did come from.

Nall was arrested and convicted of misdemeanor charges of possessing marijuana and paraphernalia.

She appealed and in April 2007 a judge dismissed her conviction because prosecutors failed to respond to Nall’s motion to suppress evidence seized in the 2002 raid.

Police used her letter to the editor in The Birmingham News as reason for the search, Nall says.

She became a guest host for segments on Emery’s online Pot TV show for about 2 1/2 years. The role included making trips around the country to cover pot-related news.

“She got all fired up,” Emery said of Nall in a recent interview with AL.com. “She has always been an advocate for legalization in a very inhospitable state.”

It’s always tough to advocate for legalization in a red state and particularly in the Bible Belt, Emery added. But, he said, “at no point does the Bible advocate against cannabis,” he said.

In 2010, Emery pleaded guilty to federal charges in the United States. He was sentenced to five years for manufacturing marijuana. Among the  allegations were that he shipped marijuana seeds over the border into the United States. He was released in 2014. And two months ago he was arrested by Montreal police after opening six illegal marijuana dispensaries around that city, according to the Toronto Sun newspaper. His trial is pending on that case.

“They turned me into an activist by raiding my home and trying to take my children ..” – Loretta Nall

Meanwhile, Canada this spring will likely consider legislation to legalize recreational marijuana nationwide.

In 2002, when Nall formed and became the first president of the U.S. Marijuana Party, recreational marijuana was banned in all states. Today eight states and Washington D.C. have legalized recreational marijuana. More than half the country has legalized marijuana for medical use and surveys show most Americans believe marijuana should be legal.

Nall’s party has also expanded with the changing attitudes. Today the group lists active chapters in 17 states. Yet Alabama isn’t one of them.

Nall left the group in 2004 but she said she still acts as an adviser. She later entered the race for Governor of Alabama in 2006 with the Libertarian party. Her top platform issue was legalization of marijuana.

Nall ran a colorful campaign that got national attention. Campaign materials included a photo of the woman displaying her ample cleavage above the words ”More of these boobs.” Below were photos of other candidates, including Gov. Bob Riley, and the words ”And less of these boobs.”

Her campaign sold bosomed-themed T-shirts, ”stash boxes,” and ”anti-state” thong underwear.

Nall, however, couldn’t get her name on Alabama ballots because the Libertarian Party couldn’t get the required 40,000 signatures. So she ran a write-in campaign. She said she got about 2,500 votes of the write-ins that were counted.

After the election Nall continued to write for Cannabis Culture magazine (a Marc Emery publication) and briefly branched her activism into another issue. In 2007, after Alabama outlawed the sale of sex toys,  Nall started a “Sex Toys for Troy King” drive that included her sending an inflatable pig to the then Alabama attorney general’s office.

Nall also started the Alabamian Compassionate Care group and pushed the Alabama Legislature for the passage of the Michael Phillips Compassionate Care Act in 2010. After that failed she pushed for it again in 2012.

That act was designed to protect from arrest and prosecution physicians who recommend marijuana and patients who use marijuana as medicine, Nall wrote in a 2012 op-ed piece for The Birmingham News.

Nall noted that other laws allowing limited medical use of marijuana were approved by state legislators in recent years. Carly’s Law and Leni’s Law, approved in 2016, allow people with seizure disorders or other debilitating medical conditions to use cannabidiol, a product derived from marijuana plants.

“Anything like that is progress,” Nall said. But, she said, “there are lots of people that doesn’t apply to that can’t get any help.”

Still, Nall hopes one day the state will legalize recreational use of marijuana in Alabama. “We’re still way behind,” Nall said.

“I’m still in favor of the legalization of marijuana … Retail sales. The whole nine yards, like has been done in (other states),” Nall said. “You ought to be able to grow at home like you do tomatoes.”

Nall, however, agrees that there needs to be age limitations on it use.

Only when voters make state legislators change direction or the legislators see the tax money that’s to be had will Alabama ever get recreational pot, Nall said. “My money’s on the money,” she said.

By legalizing pot, it might keep people from getting addicted to opiates and other harder drugs. “Going to drug dealers (for pot) exposes them to harder drugs,” she said.

Alabama also could see an increase in taxes from the legalized sale of pot, Nall said. That money could be spent by the state on issues such as prison reform and Medicaid funding, she said.

Nall noted Colorado’s collection of millions of dollars in taxes on marijuana sales.

Licensed and regulated marijuana stores in Colorado sold nearly $1 billion worth of recreational and medical cannabis in 2015, according to a story from The Cannabist, an offshoot publication of The Denver Post.

Colorado collected more than $135 million in marijuana taxes and fees in 2015, of which more than $35 million was earmarked for school construction projects, according to The Cannabist.

Right now people who are arrested in Alabama for marijuana possession are often placed in drug courts where they have to pay high court costs and fees and prevent people from keeping a job, Nall said.

Personal issues have kept her out of the spotlight over the past five or so years, Nall said. That has included shedding an opiate addiction, she said.

Her addiction began after she had a “pretty bad” broken foot in 2007, Nall said.

After foot surgery, she was given the narcotic Percocet for pain. “All I can tell you it was a love affair from day one,” she said.

Nall said she has been “clean” for two years now from the opiate addiction.  

Nall wants the public to know that her use of marijuana wasn’t to blame for her opiate addiction. “I didn’t start opiates because I smoked weed. I started because I broke my foot,” Nall said.

“Suboxone and marijuana helped me recover from opiate addiction,” Nall said.

Nall, 42, is currently working as a 24-hour a day care-giver in the small Coosa County town of Kellyton, which is near Alexander City.

Asked if she was concerned that giving an interview might bring more trouble for her, she replied: “There’s no one on earth who doesn’t know I smoke weed.”

CONTINUE READING…

Bless The Water around the World on March 22 for World Water Day

 

Join us on World Water Day

in a Global Prayer for Water
Join us as we come together to Bless The Water around the World on March 22 for World Water Day.
Gather at your local water source, or home, and place good intentions and prayers into the water. Let’s stand in solidarity with the world’s Water Protectors and take the first step towards 
cleaning and restoring the world’s water because #WATERisLIFE.
Register now to listen to the free LIVE AUDIO BROADCAST at 5pm Pacific from Unify, led by Chief Phil Lane Jr.
And to watch the FREE UPLIFT FILM, ‘WATER is LIFE’, featuring 
Dr. Gerald Pollack, Mayan Elder Tata Pedro, Dr. Bruce Lipton,
Uqualla Medicine Man, Vandana Shiva and Whaia Whaea.

500,000 people are getting clean water access!

Want to help us make it 1 Million?

Last year, the Bless The Water campaign helped Waterbearers get clean water filters to 8 countries, and this year they are delivering their first systems on US soil, on World Water Day March 22!

Just $50 gets clean water access to 100 people for ten years!

Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2016

Secretary’s Preface

Promoting human rights and democratic governance is a core element of U.S. foreign policy. These values form an essential foundation of stable, secure, and functioning societies. Standing up for human rights and democracy is not just a moral imperative but is in the best interests of the United States in making the world more stable and secure. The 2016 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices (The Human Rights Reports) demonstrate the United States’ unwavering commitment to advancing liberty, human dignity, and global prosperity.

This year marks the 41st year the Department of State has produced annual Human Rights Reports. The United States Congress mandated these reports to provide policymakers with a holistic and accurate accounting of human rights conditions in nearly 200 countries and territories worldwide, including all member states of the United Nations and any country receiving U.S. foreign assistance. The reports cover internationally recognized individual civil, political, and worker rights, as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international instruments.

The Human Rights Reports reflect the concerted efforts of our embassies and consulates to gather the most accurate information possible. They are prepared by human rights officers at U.S. missions around the world who review information available from a wide variety of civil society, government, and other sources. These reports represent thousands of work-hours as each country team collects and analyzes information. The Department of State strives to make the reports objective and uniform in scope and quality.

The Human Rights Reports are used by the U.S. Legislative, Executive, and Judicial Branches as a resource for shaping policy and guiding decisions, informing diplomatic engagements, and determining the allocation of foreign aid and security sector assistance. The Human Rights Reports are also used throughout the world to inform the work of human rights advocates, lawmakers, academics, businesses, multilateral institutions, and NGOs.

The Department of State hopes these reports will help other governments, civil society leaders, activists, and individuals reflect on the situation of human rights in their respective countries and work to promote accountability for violations and abuses.

Our values are our interests when it comes to human rights. The production of these reports underscores our commitment to freedom, democracy, and the human rights guaranteed to all individuals around the world.

I hereby transmit the Department of State’s Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2016 to the United States Congress.

Rex W. Tillerson
Secretary of State

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PDF DOC of Formal Report

What is ALEC?

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About ALEC

The American Legislative Exchange Council is America’s largest nonpartisan, voluntary membership organization of state legislators dedicated to the principles of limited government, free markets and federalism.

ALEC’s activities, while legal,[14] received public scrutiny after being reported by liberal groups in 2011 and after news reports from outlets such as The New York Times and Bloomberg Businessweek described ALEC as an organization that gave corporate interests outsized influence.[8][9] Resulting public pressure led to a number of legislators and corporations withdrawing from the organization.


ALEC is not a lobby; it is not a front group. It is much more powerful than that. Through the secretive meetings of the American Legislative Exchange Council, corporate lobbyists and state legislators vote as equals on ‘model bills’ to change our rights that often benefit the corporations’ bottom line at public expense. ALEC is a pay-to-play operation where corporations buy a seat and a vote on ‘task forces’ to advance their legislative wish lists and can get a tax break for donations, effectively passing these lobbying costs on to taxpayers.

Along with legislators, corporations have membership in ALEC. Corporations sit on ALEC task forces and vote with legislators to approve “model” bills. They have their own corporate governing board which meets jointly with the legislative board. (ALEC says that corporations do not vote on the board.) Corporations fund almost all of ALEC’s operations.

Participating legislators, overwhelmingly conservative Republicans, then bring those proposals home and introduce them in statehouses across the land as their own brilliant ideas and important public policy innovations—without disclosing that corporations crafted and voted on the bills.

ALEC boasts that it has over 1,000 of these bills introduced by legislative members every year, with one in every five of them enacted into law. ALEC describes itself as a “unique,” “unparalleled” and “unmatched” organization. We agree. It is as if a state legislature had been reconstituted, yet corporations had pushed the people out the door.

 

 

ALEC is a corporate bill mill. It is not just a lobby or a front group; it is much more powerful than that. Through ALEC, corporations hand state legislators their wishlists to benefit their bottom line. Corporations fund almost all of ALEC’s operations. They pay for a seat on ALEC task forces where corporate lobbyists and special interest reps vote with elected officials to approve “model” bills. Learn more at the Center for Media and Democracy’s ALECexposed.org, and check out breaking news on our PRWatch.org site.

Corporate Board

For a more complete list of current and former ALEC formerly “Private Enterprise” Advisory Council (formerly “Private Enterprise” Board of Directors) members, see the “Private Enterprise” Board of Directors list. Advisory council corporations have included (members as of June 2014 in bold):[1][2][3]

 

 

 

 

Reference Links:

http://www.alecexposed.org/wiki/What_is_ALEC%3F

http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/ALEC_Corporations

https://www.alec.org/meeting/2017-spring-task-force-summit-charlotte-north-carolina/

https://www.alec.org/about/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Legislative_Exchange_Council