Tag Archives: Cannabis

TRUMP’S DHS CHIEF JUST FLIPPED! WHAT HE SAID ABOUT THE WAR ON DRUGS IS GAME-CHANGING!

 

Untitled

The Next News Network

Published on Apr 18, 2017

MORE INFO: http://CannaSense.com | Email Jordan jpage@cannasense.com | Sub for more: http://nnn.is/the_new_media | Eliot Nelson for the Huffington Post reports, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly said that marijuana “is not a factor in the drug war,” placing him at odds with a number of other Trump administration officials.
Take action MORE INFO: http://CannaSense.com
Email Jordan jpage@cannasense.com
See the report here:
https://youtu.be/LM-f3qlRYMM
ref:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/j…
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CONTINUE TO VIDEO!!!

DoJ Task Force Moves to Review Federal Cannabis Policy

In a DoJ memo, AG Jeff Sessions called for a subcommittee on marijuana and an email shows the DEA inquiring about Colorado cases.

By Aaron G. Biros

In a memo sent throughout the Department of Justice on April 5th, attorney general Jeff Sessions outlines the establishment of the Department’s Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety. That task force, largely focused on violent crime, is supposed to find ways that federal prosecutors can more effectively reduce illegal immigration, violent crimes and gun violence.

The task force is made up of subcommittees, according to the memo, and one of them is focused on reviewing federal cannabis policy. “Task Force subcommittees will also undertake a review of existing policies in the areas of charging, sentencing, and marijuana to ensure consistency with the Department’s overall strategy on reducing violent crime and with Administration goals and priorities,” the memo reads. “Another subcommittee will explore our use of asset forfeiture and make recommendations on any improvements needed to legal authorities, policies, and training to most effectively attack the financial infrastructure of criminal organizations.” Those existing policies that Sessions refers to in the memo could very well be the 2013 Cole Memorandum, an Obama administration decree that essentially set up a framework for states with legal cannabis laws to avoid federal enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act.

In the past, Sessions has said he thinks the Cole Memo is valid, but remains skeptical of medical cannabis. In the last several months, comments made by Sessions and White House press secretary Sean Spicer have sparked outrage and growing fears among stakeholders in the cannabis industry, including major business players and state lawmakers. As a general feeling of uncertainty surrounding federal cannabis policy grows, many are looking for a safe haven, which could mean looking to markets outside of the U.S., like Canada, for example.

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL)
Photo: Gage Skidmore, Flickr

Washington State’s former Attorney General Rob McKenna, Washington State’s former Chief Deputy Attorney General Brian Moran, and Maryland’s former Chief Deputy Attorney General Kay Winfree recently went on the record identifying the BioTrack THC traceability system as fully compliant with the Cole Memo. “The key to meeting the requirements of the Cole Memorandum is ‘both the existence of a strong and effective state regulatory system, and an operation’s compliance with that system’,” says the former attorney general and chief deputy attorneys general in a press release. “As described above, Washington State has a robust, comprehensive regulatory scheme that controls the entire marijuana supply chain.

The email sent to Colorado prosecutor Michael Melito

The flagship component of this regulatory scheme is the WSLCB’s seed to sale inventory system, the BioTrackTHC Traceability System.” Those commendations from a former attorney general could provide some solace to business operating with the seed-to-sale traceability software.

Still though, worries in the industry are fueled by speculation and a general lack of clarity from the Trump Administration and the Department of Justice. In an email obtained by an open records request and first reported by the International Business Times, a DEA supervisor asked a Colorado prosecutor in the state attorney general’s office about a number of cannabis-related prosecutions. The DEA supervisor asked for the state docket numbers of a handful of cases, including one involving cannabis being shipped out of state, according to The Denver Post. “Some of our intel people are trying to track down info regarding some of DEA’s better marijuana investigations for the new administration,” reads the email. “Hopefully it will lead to some positive changes.” So far, only speculations have emerged pertaining to its significance or lack thereof and what this could possibly mean for the future of federal cannabis policy.

CONTINUE READING…

I’m a professional making over $100k a year and I smoke lots of high-grade marijuana every single day. Is this unusual? Are there others like me?

7976961615_e1457307a6_m

Hello, I just found this post, and I couldn’t help myself but to add a comment!

I have used Cannabis all of my adult life and am grateful for it. I have major depression and anxiety along with other health problems which I wont elaborate on here. However, none of them were caused by Cannabis and most came before it.

I am not an “educated” person, as I only have a High School Diploma. I worked in clerical/secretarial/office positions until I was 33 full time and after that part time and I also had 2 children. I learned a lot from working – that is where most of my education came.

With that meager education I managed to bring together a little piece of the World called – “The U.S. Marijuana Party”. I own and maintain the websites and am the organizer. I have 20+ blogs, websites which “Fight for the Freedom from Prohibition of Your Freedoms”!!!

I obtained the Trademarks to U.S. Marijuana Party as well as ShereeKrider in 2015.

NO, I do not make any money at this. At least I haven’t yet. But that was never the reason for doing any of this. It was a belief and the fact that I care for people, about people and about what happens to them. I like to say what I believe and this has given me the way to do that.

Maybe, at some point, there will come a time when there will be money made for me but I’m not banking on that. If I did start to get an income from it I would make it easier to help a few people!

My point in telling you all this is that not all success in this life can be measured by the amount of money that you make. Success is when you succeed at accomplishing something that helps make the world a little bit better, or help someone who needs it.

As far as successful potheads go I think Marc Emery had a good go of it – If only he had stopped while he was ahead!

God Bless Them – There’s nothing like a successful Cannabis business person!

Myself, I’m holding out for REPEAL OF PROHIBITION!

ShereeKrider


Anonymous

Updated Jan 27, 2014

Many, many people live just like you.  There always have been, and there always will be.  I’ve known highly paid, highly functioning, and highly regarded bankers, corporate lawyers, and professors just like you.
I was in the same situation just 6 months ago.  Of course, there are plenty of people who have more than 3 or 4 drinks every day, and those people are not judged nearly as harshly — if at all — by most societies.  Social and cultural convention can be funny and at times seemingly arbitrary.  In Singapore, for instance, the law on the books is death by hanging for drug use/sale.  In Hong Kong, it’s 7 years in jail though that’s not strictly enforced, and it’s not too difficult to get — though quality isn’t up to par with the States.
Like frequent enjoyment of any pleasure, pros and cons will differ by individual, but it’s definitely not a terrible life.
Here were my pros and cons before I quit for good many months ago:
From: Dave Cheng’s answer to What’s it like to be a heavy user of marijuana on a regular basis?

Benefits:

  • The single biggest advantage to drug addiction is best described in Get Him to the Greek: it makes everything else insignificant.  All of your worries and concerns are replaced by: “when can I get high?”  This sounds terrible but can actually be fantastic.  If I have weed, I don’t feel the need to have plans every weekend and am not terribly disappointed if plans fall through.  If something better than getting stoned by myself comes up, great, but no big deal if not.
  • Instant relief for stress and pain, both mental and physical
  • Enhancement of physical pleasures.  I am high for more than half my waking hours, and I really enjoy being high.  This, like most subjective experiences, will differ based on the individual, strand, social and cultural context, etc. but for me, food tastes better, music sounds better, movies and TV are more enjoyable, books are more engaging, and most other things just seem more interesting.
  • Can aid in creativity and focus in the right situation.  Most of my Quora answers have been written while high.
  • Lowers inhibitions (e.g., more likely to open up to friends or random strangers on Quora about your weed habit)
  • Makes time pass faster by keeping you relaxed and entertained (albeit mildly) during moments of boredom and/or frustration.
  • Like all other hobbies, especially illicit ones, it lets you make friends with those who share your proclivities.  The same way being a nicotine addict gives you the excuse to go outside for air and meet your fellow smokers outside of bars.  There is an instant camaraderie and an “us vs. the squares” mentality.
  • Guilty thrill in having a (mostly) harmless secret from coworkers, friends, lovers, and family.  Possessing a part of yourself that most people will never glimpse.  Before sharing this on Quora, only 3-5 people in the world would have suspected the depths of my habit.  Those ~5 people do not include my wife or any of my family members, some of whom know I smoke but would not have come close to guessing how often.
  • Social and personal perception (i.e., self-identifying) as: anti-establishment, anti-convention, laid-back, peaceful, pleasure-seeking and life-loving

Costs:

  • Social stigma and negative stereotypes: a lot of people are going to judge based on their preconceived notions.  Social and personal perception as: lazy, unmotivated, lacking in discipline and self-control, directionless, hedonistic, nihilistic
  • Stress and hassle associated with keeping your secret from coworkers, friends, lovers, and family.  Lying to the people you are closest to and then feeling less close to them because you have to lie to them.
  • Risk of legal punishment and/or social disgrace
  • Depending on the strand and situation, occasionally can lead to increased anxiety and slight paranoia (not as acute or as often for me nowadays as when I first began smoking)
  • Lowers inhibitions (e.g., more likely to snack or watch TV to excess)
  • Severely impaired performance for: social interactions, physically-demanding activities, mentally-demanding activities that require intense focus and coherence.  While high, I find it much more difficult (though not impossible) to: mingle with unfamiliar people; jog or lift weights; and design/create new excel spreadsheets without a good model or template.
  • Getting bored more easily when sober (i.e., this is interesting but I could be stoned right now).  Becoming a more boring person as a result (boredom is boring).
  • Food, entertainment, and special occasions while sober seem less special and less enjoyable by comparison.  Pleasure and pain are relative.  Whenever I enjoy a mind-blowingly great meal, movie, or session of intercourse while sober, a small part of me regrets not being high for it.
  • When you are smoking a lot, each time you get high is less special
  • Pot hangovers.  While not nearly as bad as alcohol-induced ones, there is a general grogginess/haziness that can be long-lasting
  • Temporary damage to mental and physical health (unless we’re talking about lungs depending on how you’re smoking, in which case: possibly permanent damage)
  • Risk of addiction, albeit less than alcohol and many other drugs
  • You want things less.  Nothing is that big of a deal because in a few hours, you can still go get high and have a great time.  It’s ok if there’s nothing in the fridge or no time to cook because the most mediocre take-out in the world will taste fantastic if I smoke enough beforehand.

Full background in original answer: Dave Cheng’s answer to What’s it like to be a heavy user of marijuana on a regular basis?

 

CONTINUE READING…

“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things,”

“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things,” Senator Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), told Politico. “And so I’ll be very unhappy if the federal government decides to go into Colorado and Washington and all of these places. And that’s not [what] my interpretation of my conversation with him was. That this wasn’t his intention.”

 

Elizabeth Warren demands Jeff Sessions respect state marijuana law

Posted 1:57 PM, March 4, 2017, by Tribune Media Wire

By Ese Olumhense

States need ‘immediate assurance’ from Sessions and Department of Justice

A bipartisan group of senators sent a letter to Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Thursday, urging their former colleague not to undo a 2013 policy permitting states to set their own recreational marijuana regulations.

Led by Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) and Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), the push is a response to recent mixed messages from the Trump administration on whether it will enforce federal law which still bars recreational marijuana use, or leave the decision to implement the federal policy to the states.

Sessions, speaking to the National Association of Attorneys General on Tuesday, had said he was “dubious about marijuana.” Less than a week before, at a White House briefing, Press Secretary Sean Spicer cautioned that “greater enforcement” of the federal statute could come and later likened recreational pot use to the opioid addiction crisis happening across the country.

For some senators, however, the possibility of “greater enforcement” signals an intrusion into states’ rights in a way that is concerning.

“It is essential that states that have implemented any type of practical, effective marijuana policy receive immediate assurance from the [Department of Justice] that it will respect the ability of states to enforce thoughtful, sensible drug policies in ways that do not threaten the public’s health and safety,” the group wrote.

Though legal in some states, marijuana remains a Schedule I drug

Eight states and Washington, D.C. have legalized the recreational use of marijuana. Twenty-eight states in total have comprehensive medical marijuana laws, and 17 have limited use or limited criminal defense laws for marijuana that is used for a medicinal purpose.

Federal law, however, still classifies marijuana as a Schedule I drug, one with “no currently accepted medical use.” As recently as August, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) refused to change that designation — meaning the federal government is still armed with the authority to arrest, charge, and prosecute pot growers, buyers, or sellers in states where marijuana is legal.

Sessions has been a fierce opponent of marijuana for any use and his confirmation prompted fears that the DOJ would follow the example set by former Attorney General John Ashcroft, who served under George W. Bush, and target dispensaries in places where recreational pot use is legal.

Sessions did little to quell those fears on Tuesday, slamming the argument made by pot proponents that marijuana has medical benefits.

“Give me a break,” Sessions said, referring to a Washington Post article on marijuana as a treatment for opiate addiction. “This is the kind of argument that’s been made out there, just almost a desperate attempt to defend the harmlessness of marijuana, or even its benefits. I doubt that’s true. Maybe science will prove I’m wrong, but at this point in time you and I have a responsibility to use our best judgment.”

Senators’ concerns of overreach may be overblown

Though the senators’ letter was celebrated by some constituents on social media, the concern may be overblown.

Politico reported Thursday that behind closed doors prior to his confirmation Sessions assured some GOP senators that Department of Justice will not be implementing “greater enforcement” measures for recreational marijuana. The attorney general’s previous comments had bothered some conservative officials, who felt that a decision to crack down on legal pot would be an unwelcome overreach.

“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things,” Senator Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), told Politico. “And so I’ll be very unhappy if the federal government decides to go into Colorado and Washington and all of these places. And that’s not [what] my interpretation of my conversation with him was. That this wasn’t his intention.”

Upending the Obama-era legal pot directive would not only be unpopular with some senators, but unfavorable to the majority of Americans. It would also be difficult, as the DEA only has about 4,600 employees, which would likely need to coordinate big, costly operations in states in which law enforcement has no laws against marijuana to enforce. A federal crackdown in the courts might also eliminate many of the regulations and oversight set by states which permit the use of marijuana.

On the flip side, making marijuana legal for recreational use nationwide would generate millions in tax revenue, advocates claim, and allow for more oversight into a growing industry. Just one year after becoming the first state to allow the purchase and sale of marijuana, Colorado raked in $53 million in revenue

CONTINUE READING…

WHO Takes First Steps To Reclassify Medical Cannabis Under International Law

marijuana

by Scott Gacek on January 01, 2017

 

It could still be a long wait, but patients in the United States may not be dependent on the Drug Enforcement Administration to reclassify marijuana.

The World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Drug Dependence (ECDD) recently met and initiated the first steps in a long process that could lead to the rescheduling of medical marijuana under international law, and has committed to hold a special session to discuss medical marijuana in the next eighteen months.

“In order for cannabis to be rescheduled, the United Nations General Assembly would vote on a recommendation made by the CND.”

Eighteen months may seem like a long time, but discussions regarding the potential rescheduling of cannabis have been stalled for years, and the process could result in fundamental changes in the way medical marijuana research and regulations are handled in the United States and around the world.

The ECDD is a very influential committee whose recommendations are made to the Secretary General of the United Nations, who can then bring the recommendations to a vote by the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND). In order for cannabis to be rescheduled, the United Nations General Assembly would vote on a recommendation made by the CND.

If approved by the UN General Assembly, those changes would then be reflected in the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, which currently lists cannabis as a Schedule I and IV substance, meaning a substance with a high risk of abuse, produces ill effects, and has no potential therapeutic benefit.

Under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, which was ratified in 1961 and is signed by 185 of the 193 countries that make up the United Nations, including the United States, member countries are responsible for passing and enforcing their own drug laws, but the Single Convention is regarded as the standard for international drug laws. Many lawmakers point to the Single Convention as the primary obstacle in the United States’ inability to reschedule cannabis.

According to an extract from the 38th Expert Committee on Drug Dependence that convened from November 14-18 in Geneva, the committee recognized an increase in the use of cannabis and its components for medical purposes, the emergence of new cannabis-related pharmaceutical preparations for therapeutic use, and that cannabis has never been subject to a formal pre-review or critical review by the ECDD.

Over the next eighteen months, the committee has requested pre-reviews for cannabis plant matter, extracts and tinctures, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and stereoisomers of THC.

This pre-review is a preliminary analysis used to determine if a more in-depth critical review will be undertaken by the ECDD, and will represent the first new scientific guidance on marijuana to the United Nations since 1935, when cannabis was first classified as a Schedule I/IV substance by the Health Committee of the League of Nations.

Rescheduling at the international level would have major ramifications for US policy on medical cannabis, as all too often politicians cite the Single Convention as the reason Congress cannot move towards rescheduling cannabis. So while this may seem like a long, drawn out process, it could ultimately remove that final roadblock, making it well worth the wait.

CONTINUE READING…

LINK TO UN PDF DOC…

RELATED:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/keith-humphreys/can-the-united-nations-bl_b_3977683.html

https://massroots.com/blog/un-warns-us-and-canada-on-legal-marijuana

Democrats Call For Attorney General Sessions To Resign

Image result for SESSIONS RESIGN

March 2, 20175:08 AM ET

Heard on Morning Edition

Democratic leaders want Attorney General Jeff Sessions to resign after news reports that he met with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. twice last year.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is defending his meetings with a Russian diplomat The Washington Post reports Sessions met twice with Russia’s ambassador during the presidential campaign and did not disclose it.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now some Democrats want the attorney general to resign or at least keep away from the FBI investigation he’s overseeing into Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election.

INSKEEP: Here’s what we know. Sessions was a senator at the time of the reported meetings, and he was also advising presidential candidate Donald Trump.

MARTIN: The Post found Sessions met twice with Russia’s ambassador, including once in September, the height of the campaign. After the election, at his Senate confirmation hearing to become attorney general, Sessions said he didn’t know of any Trump campaign meetings with Russia.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JEFF SESSIONS: Senator Franken, I’m not aware of any of those activities. I have been called a surrogate at a time or two in that campaign, and I didn’t have – not have communications with the Russians, and I’m unable to comment on it.

INSKEEP: Sessions was answering Senator Al Franken, who now says if The Post report is true, Sessions must recuse himself from any decisions about the Russia probe. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham said the same last night on CNN.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

LINDSEY GRAHAM: If there is something there and it goes up the chain of investigation, it is clear to me that Jeff Sessions, who is my dear friend, cannot make this decision about Trump. So they may be not – there may be nothing there, but if there is something there that the FBI believes is criminal in nature, then for sure you need a special prosecutor.

MARTIN: Attorney General Sessions and other officials do not appear to explicitly deny meeting Russia’s ambassador. They do suggest the meetings were not relevant to the election. In a statement last night, Jeff Sessions said he has, quote, “never met with any Russian officials to discuss issues of the campaign. I have no idea what this allegation is all about. It is false.”

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CONTINUE READING AND TO AUDIO!

I need people to call and email every single community access t.v. station in Vermont!

Cris Ericsonto U.S. Marijuana Party of Vermont

4 hrs ·

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, closeup

I need volunteers, my video is now
on the VMX statewide server,
so I need people to call and
email every single community
access t.v. station in Vermont
and ask them to please air it.
The more emails and calls, the
better! Here is the list of stations
to call and email:
http://vermontaccess.net/amo
They have to stop airing
political candidate videos
at midnight Sunday, because
they aren’t allowed to air them
2 days before an election.
Please remind them that I am
on the statewide ballot!
U.S. Marijuana Party candidate,
Cris Ericson, on the official election
ballot for U.S. Senator, speaks for ten
minutes on SAPA TV, Channel 10
in Springfield, Vermont on the
subject of a fair marijuana
roadside test and race track.
http://www.sapatv.org/sapa-tv-channel-10/
Thursday, November 3, 2016
11:06 PM Cris Ericson – Roadside Marijuana Testing
Friday, November 4, 2016
7:45 AM Cris Ericson – Roadside Marijuana Testing
Saturday, November 5, 2016
3:15 PM Cris Ericson – Roadside Marijuana Testing
http://www.sapatv.org/sapa-tv-channel-10/

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, closeup

VOTE for CRIS ERICSON U.S. CONGRESS Vermont 2018

 

Please donate to Cris Ericson by sending a check or
money order to:
Cris Ericson
879 Church Street, Chester, VT 05143

and if you do not receive a Thank You card soon,please call (802)875-4038 or email crisericson@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

2018 VOTE CRIS ERICSON for UNITED STATES CONGRESS
if you live in Vermont!
http://www.crisericson.com
1-802-289-1000 TEXT MESSAGES ONLY

Watch U.S. Marijuana Party candidate, Cris Ericson, for U.S. Senator in this debate!

Watch U.S. Marijuana Party candidate,
Cris Ericson, for U.S. Senator in this debate!
On the left, Pete Diamondstone of the
Liberty Union Party, Cris Ericson,
United States Marijuana Party, incumbent
current U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy (D),
Scott Milne (R), and Jerry Trudell (I).
http://vermontpbs.org/show/22078/0
October 27, 2016

At Vermont PBS Debate, Leahy Pans Milne Term Limit ProposalPosted By Paul Heintz on Fri, Oct 28, 2016 at 12:27 AM
Republican Senate nominee Scott Milne on Thursday morning called for a constitutional amendment to prevent U.S. senators from serving more than two six-year terms. But at a Colchester debate that evening hosted by Vermont PBS, his Democratic opponent dismissed the idea.
“Well, we do have term limits. It’s called elections,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), who has served seven terms and is seeking an eighth.
“I know my predecessor was elected the year I was born and served ’til I got there,” the incumbent said, referring to the late senator George Aiken, who served from 1941 to 1975. “I think Vermont gained a great deal because of his tenure and his seniority.”
Leahy, a Middlesex resident, argued that such a constitutional amendment “wont’t pass” and said that if voters felt he had “been there too long,” they could “vote for somebody else.”
Constitutional amendments do, indeed, face a high bar. Two-thirds of both the House and Senate would have to vote to send a proposed amendment to the states — three quarters of which would have to ratify it. (Alternately, two-thirds of the states could call for a constitutional convention, though that approach has never succeeded.)
In his proposal, Milne suggested a workaround if a constitutional amendment failed to pass muster: A bill revoking the pensions of senators who serve longer than two terms and members of the U.S. House who serve more than four. Milne entitled his proposed legislation, “The Leahy Act to Prevent Career Politics.”
At Thursday’s debate, Milne said he “completely disagree[d]” that regular elections were sufficient, arguing that “96 percent of incumbent senators that run for reelection get elected.”
“I think this deadly concoction of special-interest money, which has infected Washington over the last 42 years, is ruining our country,” the Pomfret Republican said. “I believe that Sen. Leahy is the poster child for what’s gone wrong in Washington in the last 42 years.”
Like Leahy, Milne also name-dropped Aiken, asserting that the late senator had spent just $5,000 on all his campaigns combined.
“He didn’t have a 65-person staff to run around and help him get reelected,” Milne said, referring to the incumbent’s Senate employees. “He did it based on representing Vermonters in a truly Democratic way.”
Jerry Trudell, an independent candidate from Derby, made a different historical allusion.
“I’d like to quote Sen. Leahy. This is a 42-year-old quote: ‘It’s time to bring a fresh, new approach and leadership to government,'” Trudell said, reading a selection from Leahy’s 1972 campaign kickoff speech. “Term limits, I think, would be very useful, because of something called the seniority system, which creates entrenched power brokers, who bottle up good legislation in committee.”
Trudell conceded that “experience does count,” but he said he “strongly” supported term limits because he viewed them as necessary “to break this congressional logjam.” He then turned to Milne and asked whether he would have supported term limits for Aiken.
“I’ve paid a lot of attention to politics,” Milne said. “I did not believe we needed term limits until we see what’s happened over the last 42 years.”
The two other Senate candidates — Liberty Union nominee Peter Diamondstone and U.S. Marijuana Party nominee Cris Ericson — sided with the incumbent on the question. But that didn’t keep them from throwing bombs.
“Even when he’s a war criminal, I tend to agree with Sen. Leahy that we already have term limits, and they’re called elections,” said Diamondstone, who lives in Dummerston. “And I would support that as the only form of term limits, and I would get rid of it as it exists in the presidency currently in the Constitution.”
“I’ll agree that term limits are, you know, handled through elections, but Sen. Leahy has got to go, and he’s got to go now,” said Ericson, accusing Leahy of bringing F-35 fighter jets to Vermont, polluting Lake Champlain and failing to secure enough federal funding for low-income housing.
Given a chance to respond to the various allegations, Leahy said he had “gone all over the state” and “talked to thousands of people.”
“Almost everywhere I go, Republicans and Democrats, they tell me, ‘We’re tired of this negative campaigning. We’re tired of negative ads.’ And they thank me for the fact that I’ve never run a negative ad. I don’t run a negative campaign, and I’m not going to start it now.”
Editor’s note: Paul Heintz served as co-moderator of the Vermont PBS senatorial debate.
http://www.sevendaysvt.com/OffMessage/archives/2016/10/28/at-vermont-pbs-debate-leahy-pans-milne-term-limit-proposal