Tag Archives: Marijuana

The Origin of the Word ‘Marijuana’

Anna Wilcox

The word “marijuana” plays a controversial role in cannabis culture. Many well-known organizations such as Oakland’s Harborside Heath Center have publicly denounced “the M word” in favor of our favorite plant’s Latinate name, cannabis. Even Salon Magazine, a major press outlet outside of the cannabis industry, published an article titled “Is the word ‘Marijuana’ racist?” last year.

As mainstream culture becomes a little more herb-friendly, the terminology used by the industry is coming to center stage. But, why exactly does the term “marijuana” cause so much debate? Even worse, why has the word gained publicity as a racist term?

To save you from reading those lengthy history books or some boring academic articles, we’ve created this brief timeline to give you the low-down on “marijuana”’s rise to popularity in the United States. Here’s what you need to know:

The Mexican Revolution

1840-1900:

Prior to 1910, “marijuana” didn’t exist as a word in American culture. Rather, “cannabis” was used, most often in reference to medicines and remedies for common household ailments. In the early 1900s, what have now become pharmaceutical giants—Bristol-Meyer’s Squib and Eli Lilly—used to include cannabis and cannabis extracts in their medicines.

During this time, Americans (particularly elite Americans) were going through a hashish trend. Glamorized by literary celebrities such as Alexander Dumas, experimenting with cannabis products became a fad among those wealthy enough to afford imported goods.

1910:

Between the years of 1910 and 1920, over 890,000 Mexicans legally immigrated into the United States seeking refuge from the wreckage of civil war. Though cannabis had been a part of U.S. history since the country’s beginnings, the idea of smoking the plant recreationally was not as common as other forms of consumption. The idea of smoking cannabis entered mainstream American consciousness after the arrival of immigrants who brought the smoking habit with them.

1913:

The first bill criminalizing the cultivation of “locoweed” was passed in California. The bill was a major push from the Board of Pharmacy as a way to regulate opiates and psychoactive pharmaceuticals, and seemingly did not stem from the “reefer madness” or racialized understanding of “marijuana” that paved the way to full-on prohibition in the 1930s.

The Aftermath

1930s:

The Great Depression had just hit the United States, and Americans were searching for someone to blame. Due to the influx of immigrants (particularly in the South) and the rise of suggestive jazz music, many white Americans began to treat cannabis (and, arguably, the Blacks and Mexican immigrants who consumed it) as a foreign substance used to corrupt the minds and bodies of low-class individuals.

In the time just before the federal criminalization of the plant, 29 states independently banned the herb that came to be known as “marijuana.”

Harry Anslinger:

It would not be an overstatement to say that Harry Anslinger was one of the primary individuals responsible for creating the stigma surrounding cannabis. Hired as the first director of the recently created Federal Bureau of Narcotics in 1930, Anslinger launched a vigilant campaign against cannabis that would hold steady for the three decades he remained in office.

A very outspoken man, Anslinger used the recent development of the movie theater to spread messages that racialized the plant for white audiences. In one documented incident, Anslinger testified before Congress, explaining:

“Marijuana is the most violence-causing drug in the history of mankind… Most marijuana smokers are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage.”

In another statement, Anslinger articulated: “Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men…the primary reason to outlaw marijuana is its effect on the degenerate races.”

In retrospect, Anslinger’s efforts with the Bureau of Narcotics were the reason “marijuana” became a word known by Americans all over the country. When making public appearances and crafting propaganda films such as Reefer Madness, Anslinger specifically used the term “marijuana” when campaigning against the plant, adding to the development of the herb’s new “foreign” identity.

Cannabis was no longer the plant substance found in medicines and consumed unanimously by American’s all over the country.

1937:

The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 was the culmination of Anslinger’s work and the first step to all-out prohibition. The bill federally criminalized the cannabis plant in every U.S. state. In order to discourage the production of cannabis use, the Tax Act of 1937 placed a one dollar tax on anyone who sold or cultivated the cannabis plant.

On top of the tax itself, the bill mandated that all individuals comply with certain enforcement provisions. Violation of the provisions would result in imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $2,000.

Though the word “marijuana” is the most common name for cannabis in the United States today, its history is deeply steeped in race, politics, and a complicated cultural revolution. Some argue that using the word ignores a history of oppression against Mexican immigrants and African Americans, while others insist that the term has now lost its prejudiced bite. Regardless of whether or not you decide to use the word yourself, it’s impossible to deny the magnitude and racial implications of its introduction to the American lexicon.

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TRUMP’S DHS CHIEF JUST FLIPPED! WHAT HE SAID ABOUT THE WAR ON DRUGS IS GAME-CHANGING!

 

Untitled

The Next News Network

Published on Apr 18, 2017

MORE INFO: http://CannaSense.com | Email Jordan jpage@cannasense.com | Sub for more: http://nnn.is/the_new_media | Eliot Nelson for the Huffington Post reports, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly said that marijuana “is not a factor in the drug war,” placing him at odds with a number of other Trump administration officials.
Take action MORE INFO: http://CannaSense.com
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CONTINUE TO VIDEO!!!

DoJ Task Force Moves to Review Federal Cannabis Policy

In a DoJ memo, AG Jeff Sessions called for a subcommittee on marijuana and an email shows the DEA inquiring about Colorado cases.

By Aaron G. Biros

In a memo sent throughout the Department of Justice on April 5th, attorney general Jeff Sessions outlines the establishment of the Department’s Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety. That task force, largely focused on violent crime, is supposed to find ways that federal prosecutors can more effectively reduce illegal immigration, violent crimes and gun violence.

The task force is made up of subcommittees, according to the memo, and one of them is focused on reviewing federal cannabis policy. “Task Force subcommittees will also undertake a review of existing policies in the areas of charging, sentencing, and marijuana to ensure consistency with the Department’s overall strategy on reducing violent crime and with Administration goals and priorities,” the memo reads. “Another subcommittee will explore our use of asset forfeiture and make recommendations on any improvements needed to legal authorities, policies, and training to most effectively attack the financial infrastructure of criminal organizations.” Those existing policies that Sessions refers to in the memo could very well be the 2013 Cole Memorandum, an Obama administration decree that essentially set up a framework for states with legal cannabis laws to avoid federal enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act.

In the past, Sessions has said he thinks the Cole Memo is valid, but remains skeptical of medical cannabis. In the last several months, comments made by Sessions and White House press secretary Sean Spicer have sparked outrage and growing fears among stakeholders in the cannabis industry, including major business players and state lawmakers. As a general feeling of uncertainty surrounding federal cannabis policy grows, many are looking for a safe haven, which could mean looking to markets outside of the U.S., like Canada, for example.

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL)
Photo: Gage Skidmore, Flickr

Washington State’s former Attorney General Rob McKenna, Washington State’s former Chief Deputy Attorney General Brian Moran, and Maryland’s former Chief Deputy Attorney General Kay Winfree recently went on the record identifying the BioTrack THC traceability system as fully compliant with the Cole Memo. “The key to meeting the requirements of the Cole Memorandum is ‘both the existence of a strong and effective state regulatory system, and an operation’s compliance with that system’,” says the former attorney general and chief deputy attorneys general in a press release. “As described above, Washington State has a robust, comprehensive regulatory scheme that controls the entire marijuana supply chain.

The email sent to Colorado prosecutor Michael Melito

The flagship component of this regulatory scheme is the WSLCB’s seed to sale inventory system, the BioTrackTHC Traceability System.” Those commendations from a former attorney general could provide some solace to business operating with the seed-to-sale traceability software.

Still though, worries in the industry are fueled by speculation and a general lack of clarity from the Trump Administration and the Department of Justice. In an email obtained by an open records request and first reported by the International Business Times, a DEA supervisor asked a Colorado prosecutor in the state attorney general’s office about a number of cannabis-related prosecutions. The DEA supervisor asked for the state docket numbers of a handful of cases, including one involving cannabis being shipped out of state, according to The Denver Post. “Some of our intel people are trying to track down info regarding some of DEA’s better marijuana investigations for the new administration,” reads the email. “Hopefully it will lead to some positive changes.” So far, only speculations have emerged pertaining to its significance or lack thereof and what this could possibly mean for the future of federal cannabis policy.

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I’m a professional making over $100k a year and I smoke lots of high-grade marijuana every single day. Is this unusual? Are there others like me?

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Hello, I just found this post, and I couldn’t help myself but to add a comment!

I have used Cannabis all of my adult life and am grateful for it. I have major depression and anxiety along with other health problems which I wont elaborate on here. However, none of them were caused by Cannabis and most came before it.

I am not an “educated” person, as I only have a High School Diploma. I worked in clerical/secretarial/office positions until I was 33 full time and after that part time and I also had 2 children. I learned a lot from working – that is where most of my education came.

With that meager education I managed to bring together a little piece of the World called – “The U.S. Marijuana Party”. I own and maintain the websites and am the organizer. I have 20+ blogs, websites which “Fight for the Freedom from Prohibition of Your Freedoms”!!!

I obtained the Trademarks to U.S. Marijuana Party as well as ShereeKrider in 2015.

NO, I do not make any money at this. At least I haven’t yet. But that was never the reason for doing any of this. It was a belief and the fact that I care for people, about people and about what happens to them. I like to say what I believe and this has given me the way to do that.

Maybe, at some point, there will come a time when there will be money made for me but I’m not banking on that. If I did start to get an income from it I would make it easier to help a few people!

My point in telling you all this is that not all success in this life can be measured by the amount of money that you make. Success is when you succeed at accomplishing something that helps make the world a little bit better, or help someone who needs it.

As far as successful potheads go I think Marc Emery had a good go of it – If only he had stopped while he was ahead!

God Bless Them – There’s nothing like a successful Cannabis business person!

Myself, I’m holding out for REPEAL OF PROHIBITION!

ShereeKrider


Anonymous

Updated Jan 27, 2014

Many, many people live just like you.  There always have been, and there always will be.  I’ve known highly paid, highly functioning, and highly regarded bankers, corporate lawyers, and professors just like you.
I was in the same situation just 6 months ago.  Of course, there are plenty of people who have more than 3 or 4 drinks every day, and those people are not judged nearly as harshly — if at all — by most societies.  Social and cultural convention can be funny and at times seemingly arbitrary.  In Singapore, for instance, the law on the books is death by hanging for drug use/sale.  In Hong Kong, it’s 7 years in jail though that’s not strictly enforced, and it’s not too difficult to get — though quality isn’t up to par with the States.
Like frequent enjoyment of any pleasure, pros and cons will differ by individual, but it’s definitely not a terrible life.
Here were my pros and cons before I quit for good many months ago:
From: Dave Cheng’s answer to What’s it like to be a heavy user of marijuana on a regular basis?

Benefits:

  • The single biggest advantage to drug addiction is best described in Get Him to the Greek: it makes everything else insignificant.  All of your worries and concerns are replaced by: “when can I get high?”  This sounds terrible but can actually be fantastic.  If I have weed, I don’t feel the need to have plans every weekend and am not terribly disappointed if plans fall through.  If something better than getting stoned by myself comes up, great, but no big deal if not.
  • Instant relief for stress and pain, both mental and physical
  • Enhancement of physical pleasures.  I am high for more than half my waking hours, and I really enjoy being high.  This, like most subjective experiences, will differ based on the individual, strand, social and cultural context, etc. but for me, food tastes better, music sounds better, movies and TV are more enjoyable, books are more engaging, and most other things just seem more interesting.
  • Can aid in creativity and focus in the right situation.  Most of my Quora answers have been written while high.
  • Lowers inhibitions (e.g., more likely to open up to friends or random strangers on Quora about your weed habit)
  • Makes time pass faster by keeping you relaxed and entertained (albeit mildly) during moments of boredom and/or frustration.
  • Like all other hobbies, especially illicit ones, it lets you make friends with those who share your proclivities.  The same way being a nicotine addict gives you the excuse to go outside for air and meet your fellow smokers outside of bars.  There is an instant camaraderie and an “us vs. the squares” mentality.
  • Guilty thrill in having a (mostly) harmless secret from coworkers, friends, lovers, and family.  Possessing a part of yourself that most people will never glimpse.  Before sharing this on Quora, only 3-5 people in the world would have suspected the depths of my habit.  Those ~5 people do not include my wife or any of my family members, some of whom know I smoke but would not have come close to guessing how often.
  • Social and personal perception (i.e., self-identifying) as: anti-establishment, anti-convention, laid-back, peaceful, pleasure-seeking and life-loving

Costs:

  • Social stigma and negative stereotypes: a lot of people are going to judge based on their preconceived notions.  Social and personal perception as: lazy, unmotivated, lacking in discipline and self-control, directionless, hedonistic, nihilistic
  • Stress and hassle associated with keeping your secret from coworkers, friends, lovers, and family.  Lying to the people you are closest to and then feeling less close to them because you have to lie to them.
  • Risk of legal punishment and/or social disgrace
  • Depending on the strand and situation, occasionally can lead to increased anxiety and slight paranoia (not as acute or as often for me nowadays as when I first began smoking)
  • Lowers inhibitions (e.g., more likely to snack or watch TV to excess)
  • Severely impaired performance for: social interactions, physically-demanding activities, mentally-demanding activities that require intense focus and coherence.  While high, I find it much more difficult (though not impossible) to: mingle with unfamiliar people; jog or lift weights; and design/create new excel spreadsheets without a good model or template.
  • Getting bored more easily when sober (i.e., this is interesting but I could be stoned right now).  Becoming a more boring person as a result (boredom is boring).
  • Food, entertainment, and special occasions while sober seem less special and less enjoyable by comparison.  Pleasure and pain are relative.  Whenever I enjoy a mind-blowingly great meal, movie, or session of intercourse while sober, a small part of me regrets not being high for it.
  • When you are smoking a lot, each time you get high is less special
  • Pot hangovers.  While not nearly as bad as alcohol-induced ones, there is a general grogginess/haziness that can be long-lasting
  • Temporary damage to mental and physical health (unless we’re talking about lungs depending on how you’re smoking, in which case: possibly permanent damage)
  • Risk of addiction, albeit less than alcohol and many other drugs
  • You want things less.  Nothing is that big of a deal because in a few hours, you can still go get high and have a great time.  It’s ok if there’s nothing in the fridge or no time to cook because the most mediocre take-out in the world will taste fantastic if I smoke enough beforehand.

Full background in original answer: Dave Cheng’s answer to What’s it like to be a heavy user of marijuana on a regular basis?

 

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Teen denied double-lung transplant after smoking marijuana

Riley Hancey, 19, was denied a double-lung transplant because of his marijuana use. (Source: KSL via CNN)

 

Salt Lake City, UT (KSL/CNN) — Up until Thanksgiving, Riley Hancey led a pretty normal life; the 19-year-old was an avid skier, river runner and biker. But then a severe form of pneumonia left him with failing lungs and nowhere to turn for help.

Within 10 days of being hospitalized, Riley Hancey’s lungs collapsed and his doctors told him he needed a double-lung transplant to live.

But Mark Hancey, Riley Hancey’s father, said because his son tested positive for THC – the chief intoxicant in marijuana – he was denied a spot on the transplant list at University of Utah Hospital.

“Riley did smoke marijuana on Thanksgiving night with his friends,” Mark Hancey, told KSL Monday. “It’s not like he’s a smoker for 30 years and (had) deteriorating lungs because of that.”

In fact, Mark Hancey said his son had been drug-free for a year prior to his illness.

Officials at the University of Utah could not talk specifically about Riley’s case, but they issued a written statement to KSL saying University Hospital follows international guidelines for transplants and evaluates cases individually.

“We do not transplant organs in patients with active alcohol, tobacco or illicit drug use or dependencies until these issues are addressed, as these substances are contraindicated for a transplant,” the statement said.

Age and other medical conditions may also exclude patients from the list, the statement said.

According to Mark Hancey, a doctor told his son, “You will die. You better get your affairs in order,” and the young man broke down in tears.

Family members set about scouring the country for a hospital willing to do the transplant. Two months ago, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania agreed.

Mark Hancey said his son was flown to Philadelphia on medical transport.

“I looked at Riley and I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, this poor soul looks like death,'” Mark Hancey said.

Twelve days ago, doctors gave Riley Hancey two donor lungs.

“He looked so healthy,” Mark Hancey said. “It made all the difference, and he still looks healthy. … He still fighting, and he’s doing well.”

Riley Hancey remained under sedation Monday and hasn’t communicated a lot with anyone yet. Mark Hancey said his son will recover at the hospital in Philadelphia for a year, with family members visiting for support.

Mark Hancey said doctors are optimistic that Riley Hancey will be able to return to many of his favorite activities after a lot of recovery.

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Vermont House Committee Approves Proposal to End Marijuana Prohibition

“Vermonters are ready to close the book on marijuana prohibition.”

https://files.merryjane.com/uploads/article/hero_image/3803/main_content_Vermont_WIDE.jpg

Vermont’s House Judiciary Committee voted 8-3 to approve a bill that would make personal possession and cultivation of small amounts of marijuana legal for adults. The bill, H. 170, would eliminate the state’s civil penalty for possessing one ounce or less of marijuana. The bill would also eliminate the penalty for possessing up to two mature cannabis plants and up to four immature plants. Penalties for possessing over an ounce of marijuana would also be reduced.

“Today’s vote shows just how far this issue has advanced in just this past year,” said Matt Simon, New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project. “Most Vermonters agree it makes no sense to continue punishing adults for consuming a less harmful substance than alcohol — especially now that it is legal for adults in Massachusetts and Maine. Vermonters are ready to close the book on marijuana prohibition.”

The bill will come up for a vote in the Vermont House of Representatives as soon as this Friday, and will move on to the state Senate if it passes. A new statewide poll has found that 57% of Vermont voters support allowing adults 21 and older to possess and grow limited amounts of weed. Only 39% of those polled are opposed to marijuana legalization.

“I like this bill,” Republican Rep. Thomas Burditt said. “There is minimal government intervention, and when I look at some of the other states that have legalized, I look at maximum government intervention.”

 

Chris Moore

Chris Moore is a New York-based writer who has written for Mass Appeal while also mixing records and producing electronic music.

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“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things,”

“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things,” Senator Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), told Politico. “And so I’ll be very unhappy if the federal government decides to go into Colorado and Washington and all of these places. And that’s not [what] my interpretation of my conversation with him was. That this wasn’t his intention.”

 

Elizabeth Warren demands Jeff Sessions respect state marijuana law

Posted 1:57 PM, March 4, 2017, by Tribune Media Wire

By Ese Olumhense

States need ‘immediate assurance’ from Sessions and Department of Justice

A bipartisan group of senators sent a letter to Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Thursday, urging their former colleague not to undo a 2013 policy permitting states to set their own recreational marijuana regulations.

Led by Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) and Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), the push is a response to recent mixed messages from the Trump administration on whether it will enforce federal law which still bars recreational marijuana use, or leave the decision to implement the federal policy to the states.

Sessions, speaking to the National Association of Attorneys General on Tuesday, had said he was “dubious about marijuana.” Less than a week before, at a White House briefing, Press Secretary Sean Spicer cautioned that “greater enforcement” of the federal statute could come and later likened recreational pot use to the opioid addiction crisis happening across the country.

For some senators, however, the possibility of “greater enforcement” signals an intrusion into states’ rights in a way that is concerning.

“It is essential that states that have implemented any type of practical, effective marijuana policy receive immediate assurance from the [Department of Justice] that it will respect the ability of states to enforce thoughtful, sensible drug policies in ways that do not threaten the public’s health and safety,” the group wrote.

Though legal in some states, marijuana remains a Schedule I drug

Eight states and Washington, D.C. have legalized the recreational use of marijuana. Twenty-eight states in total have comprehensive medical marijuana laws, and 17 have limited use or limited criminal defense laws for marijuana that is used for a medicinal purpose.

Federal law, however, still classifies marijuana as a Schedule I drug, one with “no currently accepted medical use.” As recently as August, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) refused to change that designation — meaning the federal government is still armed with the authority to arrest, charge, and prosecute pot growers, buyers, or sellers in states where marijuana is legal.

Sessions has been a fierce opponent of marijuana for any use and his confirmation prompted fears that the DOJ would follow the example set by former Attorney General John Ashcroft, who served under George W. Bush, and target dispensaries in places where recreational pot use is legal.

Sessions did little to quell those fears on Tuesday, slamming the argument made by pot proponents that marijuana has medical benefits.

“Give me a break,” Sessions said, referring to a Washington Post article on marijuana as a treatment for opiate addiction. “This is the kind of argument that’s been made out there, just almost a desperate attempt to defend the harmlessness of marijuana, or even its benefits. I doubt that’s true. Maybe science will prove I’m wrong, but at this point in time you and I have a responsibility to use our best judgment.”

Senators’ concerns of overreach may be overblown

Though the senators’ letter was celebrated by some constituents on social media, the concern may be overblown.

Politico reported Thursday that behind closed doors prior to his confirmation Sessions assured some GOP senators that Department of Justice will not be implementing “greater enforcement” measures for recreational marijuana. The attorney general’s previous comments had bothered some conservative officials, who felt that a decision to crack down on legal pot would be an unwelcome overreach.

“He told me he would have some respect for states’ right on these things,” Senator Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), told Politico. “And so I’ll be very unhappy if the federal government decides to go into Colorado and Washington and all of these places. And that’s not [what] my interpretation of my conversation with him was. That this wasn’t his intention.”

Upending the Obama-era legal pot directive would not only be unpopular with some senators, but unfavorable to the majority of Americans. It would also be difficult, as the DEA only has about 4,600 employees, which would likely need to coordinate big, costly operations in states in which law enforcement has no laws against marijuana to enforce. A federal crackdown in the courts might also eliminate many of the regulations and oversight set by states which permit the use of marijuana.

On the flip side, making marijuana legal for recreational use nationwide would generate millions in tax revenue, advocates claim, and allow for more oversight into a growing industry. Just one year after becoming the first state to allow the purchase and sale of marijuana, Colorado raked in $53 million in revenue

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WHAT IS PRESIDENT DONALD J. TRUMP’S POSITION ON MARIJUANA NOW?

Cris Ericson

January 21

WHAT IS PRESIDENT DONALD J. TRUMP’S POSITION ON MARIJUANA NOW?

I am hoping our brand spanking new President,
Donald Trump, will create a White House version of
“The Apprentice”, something like “Live at the
White House” where President Donald Trump could
fire his Chief of Staff frequently for unethical
conduct or mis-spelling errors, or for coming back
from lunch break reeking of marijuana smoke, even
though marijuana is legal in Washington, D.C. – or
will Donald Trump decide to allow employees of
the White House to smoke a toke on lunch break?
We need to know!

President Donald Trump could fire the Chef and
Housekeeper as well, every time a tourist on the
White House Tour
stumbles upon one of those cockroaches the tourists
laugh at, or silently shriek when they see them crawling,
because their own homes have fewer pests.

Oh, and remember also, that marijuana is legal
in Washington, D.C., so now the cockroaches have
the munchies. The little bugs have more rights
than you and I do in most states of the United States
to inhale marijuana smoke and stash it in the little
cockroach nests.

Remember also, now-a-days, the cockroaches could be
fully automated spy robotic computer crawlers.

I will go further, and suggest that President Donald
Trump entertain us by installing “live-cam”
hidden video cameras around the White House
so we can enjoy his staff humping each other in
closets, and taking bribes from newspaper reporters,
and smoking marijuana on the White House Lawn out
back, because, of course, marijuana is legal in
Washington, D.C. but not in most of the states
we live in! What ever happened to the promise
of all people being treated equally?

Of course, I want President Donald Trump to create
the “President Donald Trump Pardon T.V. Show”,
to air weekly, with his television staff selecting
the most picturesque, sexy, or downright scary looking
convicts from prisons nationwide in the USA, as well
as the mothers ripped from their babies and thrown
into prison for mere marijuana possession.

President Trump could chose six finalists each week to be
questioned by him in the Oval Office, in prison
jump suits and chains, providing each one a couple
minutes to explain why Mr. Trump should chose her or
him to give the Pardon to.

Then, President Trump could send them back to prison
for a month on a quest to do good by volunteering
to help another inmate in some way, or by creating
a profitable behind-bars business.

Each week, President Trump could grant one
pardon, after airing hidden video camera footage of
guards abusing prisoners on the bus on the way
to the White House.

The group of prisoners selected for a possible pardon
might inclue a murderer, a rapist, a white collar
criminal who stole or embezzled millions, a heroin drug seller,
a mere marijuana possession convict,
and someone sentenced almost for life for a crime he or
she was tried for “as an adult” but for which the crime
committed was done as an under age minor child.

President Donald Trump should also hire musicians, some
who will be stoned on marijuana because they need it
for creative impulses, and after all, they will be in
Washington, D.C. where marijuana is legal,
to create a theme song for the show, something memorable,
we can all sing along with each week, with a chorus
about how they can smoke pot in Washington, D.C.
and most of us can not, without terrible jeopardy.

“Die sonder sond is” (He that is without sin).

Cris Ericson
2018 Vote for Cris Ericson in Vermont!
http://crisericson.com
(802)289-1000 text only

SOURCE

Democrats Call For Attorney General Sessions To Resign

Image result for SESSIONS RESIGN

March 2, 20175:08 AM ET

Heard on Morning Edition

Democratic leaders want Attorney General Jeff Sessions to resign after news reports that he met with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. twice last year.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is defending his meetings with a Russian diplomat The Washington Post reports Sessions met twice with Russia’s ambassador during the presidential campaign and did not disclose it.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now some Democrats want the attorney general to resign or at least keep away from the FBI investigation he’s overseeing into Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election.

INSKEEP: Here’s what we know. Sessions was a senator at the time of the reported meetings, and he was also advising presidential candidate Donald Trump.

MARTIN: The Post found Sessions met twice with Russia’s ambassador, including once in September, the height of the campaign. After the election, at his Senate confirmation hearing to become attorney general, Sessions said he didn’t know of any Trump campaign meetings with Russia.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JEFF SESSIONS: Senator Franken, I’m not aware of any of those activities. I have been called a surrogate at a time or two in that campaign, and I didn’t have – not have communications with the Russians, and I’m unable to comment on it.

INSKEEP: Sessions was answering Senator Al Franken, who now says if The Post report is true, Sessions must recuse himself from any decisions about the Russia probe. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham said the same last night on CNN.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

LINDSEY GRAHAM: If there is something there and it goes up the chain of investigation, it is clear to me that Jeff Sessions, who is my dear friend, cannot make this decision about Trump. So they may be not – there may be nothing there, but if there is something there that the FBI believes is criminal in nature, then for sure you need a special prosecutor.

MARTIN: Attorney General Sessions and other officials do not appear to explicitly deny meeting Russia’s ambassador. They do suggest the meetings were not relevant to the election. In a statement last night, Jeff Sessions said he has, quote, “never met with any Russian officials to discuss issues of the campaign. I have no idea what this allegation is all about. It is false.”

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I need people to call and email every single community access t.v. station in Vermont!

Cris Ericsonto U.S. Marijuana Party of Vermont

4 hrs ·

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, closeup

I need volunteers, my video is now
on the VMX statewide server,
so I need people to call and
email every single community
access t.v. station in Vermont
and ask them to please air it.
The more emails and calls, the
better! Here is the list of stations
to call and email:
http://vermontaccess.net/amo
They have to stop airing
political candidate videos
at midnight Sunday, because
they aren’t allowed to air them
2 days before an election.
Please remind them that I am
on the statewide ballot!
U.S. Marijuana Party candidate,
Cris Ericson, on the official election
ballot for U.S. Senator, speaks for ten
minutes on SAPA TV, Channel 10
in Springfield, Vermont on the
subject of a fair marijuana
roadside test and race track.
http://www.sapatv.org/sapa-tv-channel-10/
Thursday, November 3, 2016
11:06 PM Cris Ericson – Roadside Marijuana Testing
Friday, November 4, 2016
7:45 AM Cris Ericson – Roadside Marijuana Testing
Saturday, November 5, 2016
3:15 PM Cris Ericson – Roadside Marijuana Testing
http://www.sapatv.org/sapa-tv-channel-10/

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, closeup